This week we've invited Craig Fugate, head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, to the show. (So if a giant asteroid crashes into Earth while he plays our quiz, you're on your own.)

We've invited Fugate to answer three questions about Zima, a terrible alcoholic beverage from the 1990s and an actual Federal Emergency.

Prediction

27 minutes ago
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Lightning Fill In The Blank

27 minutes ago
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Limericks

27 minutes ago
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Editor's note: John Otis has reported from Latin America since the U.S. invasion of Panama in 1989, and first covered Venezuela 19 years ago. He's returned many times since, and reflects here on how the country has changed since he first arrived.

During my first reporting trip to Caracas in 1997, I was nearly robbed leaving a subway station. While riding up the escalator, I was sandwiched by two rather inept thieves who pried my wallet out of my pocket, but then dropped it. I snatched the billfold and ran.

An Argentine court has sentenced Reynaldo Bignone, the country's last dictator, to 20 years in prison for his part in Operation Condor.

It's the "first time a court has ruled that Operation Condor was a criminal conspiracy to kidnap and forcibly disappear people across international borders," The Associated Press reports.

The political revolution that Bernie Sanders began may still be felt at the ballot box this November even if he's not the Democratic nominee for president.

The Vermont senator is beginning to expand his political network by helping upstart progressive congressional candidates and state legislators, lending his fundraising prowess and national fame to boost their bids.

And win or lose for the White House hopeful, Sanders's candidacy has given them a prominent national messenger and new energy they hope will trickle down-ballot in primaries and the general election.

Donna Engeman enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1981. About two years later, she left after she got pregnant with her first-born, a son called Patrick. She left having achieved the rank of specialist and having found the love of her life, her husband, Army Chief Warrant Officer John W. Engeman.

In addition to Patrick, they had a daughter, Nicole McKenna.

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A few reflections on Barack Obama's first Elkhart visit

As Elkhart prepares for one more appearance by President Barack Obama, his first visit to the city as an Illinois senator running for the Democratic presidential nomination against Hillary Clinton reveals what has and hasn't changed. Two days before the Indiana Primary Election, Obama visited Bank Street, talking with residents and shooting some hoops with kids outside Riverview Elementary School before he spoke with me by phone. Gas prices at this time hovered around $4.50 per gallon. Two...
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