Protect My Public Media

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And for the past few weeks, we've been hearing stories about videos of police shootings. And they've come from you, Kelly - right? - on your podcast Embedded.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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I'm going to turn things over to Kelly because we have a congressional member on the line at the Capitol now, right, Kelly?

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Brutal in both subject matter and presentation, the art-house biopic I, Olga tells the story of the last woman to be given the death penalty in Czechoslovakia. Olga Hepnarova, a suicidal 22-year-old who drove her truck onto a Prague sidewalk and killed eight pedestrians in 1973, attributed her act of mass murder to her own sense of alienation from the world. To communicate this, it's understandable that directors Tomás Weinreb and Petr Kazda would choose to, well, alienate their audience.

'Life' Doesn't Quite Find A Way

18 hours ago

"Space is disease and danger wrapped in darkness and silence," Chief Medical Officer Leonard "Bones" McCoy once lamented. And that was on Star Trek, far and away the most optimistic vision of humanity's spacefaring destiny ever presented onscreen.

To fully understand the dollar-store appeal of Power Rangers, the first big-screen iteration of the media and action-figure line in two decades, one must sit through at least one or two of the five Michael Bay-directed Transformers movies, which is by no means an advisable experience. The two franchises are more or less the same — a busy assemblage of thinly wrought characters, unforgivably dense mythology, and barely comprehensible action sequences, all in service of gleaming battlebots for kids to smash together in the sandbox.

The namesake of Wilson is the kind of guy people try to avoid on the bus, at the sidewalk cafe, or while using the adjacent urinal. Yet the makers of this deadpan comedy want us to spend 90 minutes with him.

The experience isn't painful, but it is a little frustrating. Playing the reclusive, misanthropic, yet oddly gregarious title character, Woody Harrelson is as engaging as the man's personality allows. But Wilson struggles with tone, shifting from monotonously bleak to predictably satirical to improbably sanguine.

Updated at 9:48 p.m. ET

The White House issued an ultimatum to House Republicans on Thursday: Vote for the current GOP health care replacement plan or leave the Affordable Care Act in place and suffer the political consequences.

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Republican Infighting Derails Vote On Health Care Bill

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: The House of Representatives will not vote tonight on a bill that would make good on the party's promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The White House and congressional leaders insist they will get this bill passed eventually, but Republican infighting threatens to derail it. Some conservatives say it doesn't go far enough to repeal Obamacare while other Republicans are increasingly skeptical...

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