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Programming through the Holiday Season

The Afterlife of Otis Redding Sunday, Dec. 10, 4 PM Otis Redding was killed in a plane crash 50 years ago on Dec. 10, 1967. "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay," which he wrote and recorded with Steve Cropper days before, subsequently became the first posthumous number-one record on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts. Redding’s five magnificent years in showbiz transformed the sound of soul music. His grainy, growling, and “squawking” voice kept the music rooted in the older...

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Making history, Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif said he would travel to New Delhi for the swearing-in ceremony of India's new prime minister.

Narendra Modi, as you might remember, made history on his own when his BJP party drove out of power the party that had long dominated the world's largest democracy.

Sharif's attendance at Modi's swearing in will mark a first for the two countries, historical foes.

Could You Be Driving A Car With A Recall?

May 24, 2014

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Lots of people, of course, are on the road this Memorial Day weekend. The big news for many drivers is there's been more GM recalls. General Motors has recalled some 15 million cars, trucks, and SUVs around the world this year. The spokesman for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, also known as NHTSA, told Reuters that faulty ignition switches may have led to more than 13 deaths previously reported.

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Voters across Europe are going to the polls this weekend to choose representatives to Europe's Parliament in Brussels. These elections take place every five years, and they can be an important measure of the mood of voters on the continent. This year, right-wing parties are expected to do well, as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

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Vape pens look just like e-cigarettes, but they're for vaporizing marijuana. They're smoke-free and very popular among marijuana users. But it can be hard to know just how strong a dose they're getting. Reporter Miles Bryan explains.

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Today is Graduation Day at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. And, of course, it will be an emotional time for the school's principal, Frank DeAngelis. He'll be giving his final sendoff to a senior class. Mr. DeAngelis is retiring at the end of this school year. He's one of just a few staffers who stayed on at Columbine after the 1999 mass shootings there. Fifteen people died, including the two gunmen, who were also students. As NPR's Kirk Siegler reports, the massacre and the school's response to it defined Mr. DeAngelis's career.

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Teams of international observers are arriving in Ukraine ahead of tomorrow's presidential election. But in the eastern region of the country, where pro-Moscow militia are vowing to disrupt the vote, there may not be much for them to observe. Separatists say they won't allow the election to proceed in the regions that they have declared to be independent states. NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Donetsk.

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And the far right is poised to do well in Hungary's EU election tomorrow. Candidates blame the EU for many of that country's problems. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Budapest.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: To many Hungarians, a half-finished World War II monument next to a popular fountain in downtown Budapest highlights the extremist tenor of politics in this former East Bloc country.

Local produce just tastes better, right? That perception is part of what's driving the rush of new farming ventures to supply cities with food grown nearby.

Some urban farmers are even experimenting with growing food a few blocks away from or even inside the grocery store. Call it über-local food.

Most of these new ventures are lead by idealistic entrepreneurs who want to part of the new food system. It's not yet clear whether they'll fit in for the long haul.

When you think of the tools of diplomacy, food isn't always high on the list. But breaking bread together can be one of the most basic ways of finding common ground. Which is why, a couple of years ago, the State Department launched the Diplomatic Culinary Partnership.

The program created an American Chefs Corps, who represent the U.S. abroad, and invited foreign chefs and culinary professionals here to taste and talk food.

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South Bend LGBTQ to host reading of on transgender children's book

Community centers, libraries and schools across the country are reading one book Thursday, in an effort to raise awareness and education around transgender children. The book is ‘I Am Jazz” written by reality TV star and transgender child activist Jazz Jennings. The reading movement started when a parent in Wisconsin wanted the book to be read to her child’s class in an effort to explain her daughter’s transition to her classmates. The school faced backlash and cancelled the reading. A local...

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