April Lidinsky

Michiana Chronicler

April Lidinsky is a writer, activist, mother, foodie, black-belt, organic gardener, and optimist.   She directs the Women's and Gender Studies Program at IU South Bend.

Ways to Connect

April Lidinsky

I know it’s cliché in these banana republic days in the U.S. to plan an escape to Canada, but last month, I did just that. As I packed my carry-on, I daydreamed about running into Justin Trudeau and Samantha Bee.  Maybe we’d lounge around on a chesterfield, eating butter tarts and talking politics and feminism …. I know. More clichés and some crushes. Sorry.

Monica Tetzlaff

Finally, school is out, and it’s pleasure-reading season!  We’re celebrating at our house by launching a Little Free Library in our front yard. Like an excellent book, our experience has already held suspense, plot twists, and even inspired some tough self-reflection.

Spring Sap

Apr 14, 2017
April Lidinsky

When your parents name you April, and your birthday is smack in the middle of this luscious month, you just can’t help but be an optimist. I have always been more Dylan Thomas than T.S. Eliot.  My whole childhood, when teachers turned the classroom calendars to “my” month, my heart would swell like the crab apple blossoms tapping on the windows of Green Mountain Elementary.

April Lidinsky

I knew I was in trouble when a gentle question floated by another activist cracked the thin shell of tension holding me together, and I burst into manic laughter. The question was: What are you doing for self-care?

A Radical Age

Dec 16, 2016
April Lidinsky

The curse of the English major is that everything’s a metaphor. It seems to be catching.  Bleak political prognosticators have been warning, “Winter’s coming!” apropos of, well, everything in the news. Fear and division hang like a chilling haze —  but I’ve been kindling my spirits by digging into my family’s roots for lessons of diversity, warmth, and empathy. Deep down, our families — together — hold this wisdom for us to recall.

Catherine & Sarah Satrun / SatrunTwinsArtShop

Happy Wonder Woman Day, everyone!  Great Hera, it’s true.  In this political season of gob-smacking sexism, no less than the United Nations has declared October 21 “Wonder Woman Day,” with a ceremony at the New York headquarters to declare Wonder Woman as its new Honorary Ambassador for the Empowerment of Woman and Girls.  This may be little consolation to the seven accomplished women who last week were considered and rejected as the new United Nations leader, after seven decades of men at the helm. 

    “Women’s Equality Day is … Today! Sort of.” 

In this summer of politics going to heck in a hand basket, I want to offer a defense — of expertise.  Who knew we’d need to say it … and yet, here we are, with sincere folks on both sides of the Atlantic spurning the experts, spurning facts, even.  One critic of the Brexit vote Tweeted: “We now live in a “post-factual democracy; when the facts met the myths, they were as useless as bullets bouncing off the bodies of aliens in an H.G. Wells novel.” 

Well, Indiana has had its moment of political glory — serving as the iceberg that sank Ted Cruz’s ship.   Despite the ugliness, this political season has had an upside — reminding seasoned voters how exciting it is to be new to voting and crazy in love with your candidate.

My parents taught me to stand up for what I believed in. We stood by my dashing, mustachioed dad, a union plumber who occasionally walked the strike line, and I learned to explain labor disputes to my grade-school classmates.  My mom took me to my first demonstration in 1983, when I was in high school.  Our bodies formed two slender links in a17-mile human chain that surrounded Rocky Flats plant to protest their production of plutonium triggers for nuclear weapons.

Being "Mortified"

Jan 15, 2016

April Lidinsky recommends an activity that one can do from an armchair that involves time travel, emotional calisthenics, and deep gratitude for the present.

April Lindsky shares her thoughts on some recent movies with prominent female roles.

Telling the Truth

Mar 6, 2015

Oh, month of March -- I greet you with an ambivalent heart. After all, the snow still falls outside the big window in our little kitchen – that relentless lake-effect sifting that isn’t a storm, it’s a state of mind.  Still, I tromp through the crusted drifts to our forsythia bush to cut twigs to force into clustered canary blooms in windowsill vases.  The twigs are rough bronze on the outside but fierce green within.  Dead? Or Alive? I’m forcing them – and myself – to remember what hope looks like. 

George A. Spiva Center for the Arts (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license)

A few weeks ago, I was one of a half dozen guests invited to speak to a class of teenagers working through a Unitarian Universalist curriculum called “Our Whole Lives.”  The cute acronym for this program is OWL and it’s a multi-staged, holistic sexuality course that invites young people to think about their development and relationships in rich and nuanced ways.  Don’t worry; nothing I’m about to say is more than G-rated.  Our discussion was about the ways people creatively map out their lives in a culture that often seems to offer few alternative pathways.

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