April Lidinsky

Michiana Chronicler

April Lidinsky is a writer, activist, mother, foodie, black-belt, organic gardener, and optimist.   She directs the Women's and Gender Studies Program at IU South Bend.

Ways to Connect

April Lidinsky

As a nerdy kid with a competitive streak, I thought of summer reading as both a sprint and a marathon. My local library didn't host a “summer reading challenge,” so my only competition was myself … but I’m sorry to say how much I enjoyed flaunting my long list of conquered titles. Now, as a nerdy proto-crone with a competitive streak, I still relish this feeling.

April Lidinsky

Today, I offer an argument: States divide themselves one of two ways: by longitude, or latitude. For example, I grew up in Colorado, where the eastern flatlanders have little in common with western Coloradans who notch their belts by the lofty 14-ers they’ve climbed. And among western Coloradans, please don’t mistake the east-of-the-Continental Dividers from true Western Slopers. The Colorado state of mind is organized by longitude, fine-sliced on the vertical. 

 

The OpEd Project

Question: How do you know for sure if yours is a bonafide nerd family? Answer: When 3 out of 4 of you are either college students or teachers, and 4 out of 4 of you happily spend the first day of Spring Break inside a classroom. Specifically, we sat in a seminar room above the Goodman Theater in Chicago with late-winter sunshine pouring through the plate glass windows while we began to wrestle our ideas into column-length arguments suitable for publication.

April Lidinsky

So …. how are those New Year’s resolutions coming along? After an enraging political year full of marching and hollering myself hoarse, I’ve been trying something new — shutting up and listening.

April Lidinsky

Prepare yourselves, friends: the season of gastronomic gloating has begun. I plead guilty, myself, to occasionallyscraping aside the rubble on my kitchen counter to frame and post a filtered image of a felicitously turned out peach pie, with a humblebrag tag line like: “Fun to put the ol’ rolling pin to work.” Soon, our social media feeds will flood with photos of brining and bronzing birds and glamour shots of caramelized yams. 

 

April Lidinsky

Here’s a story of our changing family.  It’s a story of gender transition, a story for our times, and one I have permission to share. One I have been encouraged, actually, to share.  

 

April Lidinsky

I know it’s cliché in these banana republic days in the U.S. to plan an escape to Canada, but last month, I did just that. As I packed my carry-on, I daydreamed about running into Justin Trudeau and Samantha Bee.  Maybe we’d lounge around on a chesterfield, eating butter tarts and talking politics and feminism …. I know. More clichés and some crushes. Sorry.

Monica Tetzlaff

Finally, school is out, and it’s pleasure-reading season!  We’re celebrating at our house by launching a Little Free Library in our front yard. Like an excellent book, our experience has already held suspense, plot twists, and even inspired some tough self-reflection.

Spring Sap

Apr 14, 2017
April Lidinsky

When your parents name you April, and your birthday is smack in the middle of this luscious month, you just can’t help but be an optimist. I have always been more Dylan Thomas than T.S. Eliot.  My whole childhood, when teachers turned the classroom calendars to “my” month, my heart would swell like the crab apple blossoms tapping on the windows of Green Mountain Elementary.

April Lidinsky

I knew I was in trouble when a gentle question floated by another activist cracked the thin shell of tension holding me together, and I burst into manic laughter. The question was: What are you doing for self-care?

A Radical Age

Dec 16, 2016
April Lidinsky

The curse of the English major is that everything’s a metaphor. It seems to be catching.  Bleak political prognosticators have been warning, “Winter’s coming!” apropos of, well, everything in the news. Fear and division hang like a chilling haze —  but I’ve been kindling my spirits by digging into my family’s roots for lessons of diversity, warmth, and empathy. Deep down, our families — together — hold this wisdom for us to recall.

Catherine & Sarah Satrun / SatrunTwinsArtShop

Happy Wonder Woman Day, everyone!  Great Hera, it’s true.  In this political season of gob-smacking sexism, no less than the United Nations has declared October 21 “Wonder Woman Day,” with a ceremony at the New York headquarters to declare Wonder Woman as its new Honorary Ambassador for the Empowerment of Woman and Girls.  This may be little consolation to the seven accomplished women who last week were considered and rejected as the new United Nations leader, after seven decades of men at the helm. 

    “Women’s Equality Day is … Today! Sort of.” 

In this summer of politics going to heck in a hand basket, I want to offer a defense — of expertise.  Who knew we’d need to say it … and yet, here we are, with sincere folks on both sides of the Atlantic spurning the experts, spurning facts, even.  One critic of the Brexit vote Tweeted: “We now live in a “post-factual democracy; when the facts met the myths, they were as useless as bullets bouncing off the bodies of aliens in an H.G. Wells novel.” 

Well, Indiana has had its moment of political glory — serving as the iceberg that sank Ted Cruz’s ship.   Despite the ugliness, this political season has had an upside — reminding seasoned voters how exciting it is to be new to voting and crazy in love with your candidate.

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