Bryce Huffman

Bryce Huffman is Michigan Radio’s West Michigan Reporter. Huffman has been serving as a reporter for Michigan Radio since Fall 2016. He has covered a variety of Michigan stories, including immigrants facing deportation, the Detroit-area doctor involved in the female genital mutilation case, and residents concerned about a massive sinkhole in Macomb County. A Detroit native, Huffman graduated from Central Michigan University with a degree in Journalism. He joined Michigan Radio as a newsroom intern in May 2016.

Judges are required to suspend your driver's license if you're unable to pay court debts in Michigan, one of just five states to do that, according to a new report. 

The Legal Aid Justice Center's nationwide report says the practice unfairly punishes poor people by taking away their ability to drive legally. Some states are beginning to rethink this practice.

According to the report, about 100,000 people in Michigan currently have their licenses suspended for inability to pay court fees.

Ten undocumented immigrants were rounded up Tuesday in what immigrant advocates say is the first major farm labor camp raid in Michigan since President Trump took office.

The ten workers were arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcment officials Tuesday night at their labor camp near Hart, roughly 40 miles north of Muskegon.

The nine male farm workers are currently in ICE custody in Youngstown, Ohio. The lone female farm worker arrested in is Calhoun County, Michigan. It's unclear whether the workers will be deported.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers held a public meeting in Muskegon last night on its $275.4 million plan to keep invasive fish species out of the Great Lakes.

A recent study found that electric barriers and complex noises, like the sound of boat motors, are the most effective ways to keep certain fish away. So the plan to keep Asian carp out of Lake Michigan includes both.

Congressman Bill Huizenga is accustomed to lively town hall meetings. The meeting he held in Muskegon was no different. 

Hundreds of Huizenga's constituents attended the meeting. He was booed several times for supporting President Donald Trump and challenging the government's place in providing healthcare.

Huizenga says he supports Republican ideals more than any one person.

“What I support is a conservative philosophy that understands where people are coming from. It's not about one person,” Huizenga said. 

The city of Kalamazoo will now have more money at its disposal -- half a billion dollars more.

The Kalamazoo City Commission last night approved a gift from a private foundation that will replace a portion of the city’s budget.

Mayor Bobby Hopewell says the Foundation for Excellence can be very important to the city's future.

"Perfection's not here, but I know we worked hard to cover the gamut of issues that may come up in the future," Hopewell said. 

Michigan’s Medicaid expansion is good for hospitals' bottom line and for the people using it, according to a study released earlier this week.

The Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation (CHRT) found that between 2013 and 2015, hospitals decreased uncompensated care costs by 56%. Uncompensated care is the amount of care a hospital provides but never gets fully reimbursed for.