Tyler Scott

Tyler grew up and went to high school in Ithaca, MI. For the first two years of his undergraduate career, he attended Mid-Michigan Community College and worked as the morning-show host at WMLM 1520AM in Alma, and as a sports reporter for the Mt. Pleasant Morning Sun. In fall 2014, He transferred to the University of Michigan where he will graduate with a BA in political science next May.

Tyler is currently a columnist and sports reporter for The Michigan Daily, and has interned in the newsroom at WDET 101.9FM in Detroit. After school, Tyler definitely wants to pursue a career in journalism, but he also loves music, comedy, and many other things.

He says there are too many cool things in the world to know what he really wants to end up doing.

One in five teenagers responding to a survey have been diagnosed with a concussion at least once, according to a study published today by University of Michigan researchers.

Surveyors asked more than 13,000 teenagers from around the United States if they had ever been diagnosed with a concussion. Assistant research professor Philip Veliz says the prevalence of concussions among adolescents isn’t a topic that’s been researched much at all.

A University of Michigan graduate student who says he began kneeling at the university’s diag as a sign of protest at 7 a.m. Monday says he plans to continue for 24 hours.

As of 8:30p Monday evening, Dana Greene Jr. was still kneeling at the diag.

UPDATE: In a phone interview, Greene says he got up from his protest around 3:30am because he was physically exhausted. He says UM President Mark Schlissel called him during the day, and Greene plans to meet with Schlissel on Wednesday.

Several Democratic state representatives are planning to introduce legislation Tuesday that would require Michigan schools to be more energy efficient, and develop standards for air and water testing.

The seven-bill package is aimed at improving the health and wellness of students and teachers in schools across the state. Dubbed the “ABC Education Plan," state Rep. Stephanie Chang, D-Detroit, says the requirements outlined in the bills would also improve student achievement.

A human rights organization says a Saudi-Arabian man who was traveling to visit Western Michigan University when Saudi officials arrested him for allegedly attending pro-democracy protests could soon be executed.

According to the human rights group Reprieve, Mujtaba’a al-Sweikat was detained at a Saudi Arabian airport on his way to visit WMU in 2012, and he’s been imprisoned ever since.

This fall, two completely driverless shuttles will start running on the University of Michigan’s campus.

Researchers will be focusing on safety. But it’s also a chance to see how people interact with driverless vehicles.

Michigan State football coach Mark Dantonio took swift action to kick three football players off the team once criminal charges against them were announced.

The three players face charges related to an alleged assault of a woman that took place on MSU's campus on January 16.

Dantonio says all players – and especially freshmen – have education "thrown at them" about how to act on campus.

Powerful synthetic opioid street drugs have changed the way some law enforcement officials collect and handle drug evidence. 

Fentanyl and carfentinil are extremely powerful synthetic opiates sometimes used in street drugs that have made their way to Michigan. The drugs are especially dangerous because they can be absorbed through the air or through contact with the skin, according to Timothy Plancon, Special Agent in charge of the DEA's Detroit field office. 

Tony Paris says that in ten years as an attorney filing charges with the National Labor Relations Board, he has never had a case sent to Washington until now.

Apparently, it's because in the current political climate, immigration is a sensitive issue. 

“They have to go up through to Washington D.C. and the national office of the NLRB for what they call 'advice',” Paris said. “I was instructed that’s because of the high sensitivity of this issue.”

Anyone who drives in Michigan is no stranger to the high cost of auto insurance in the state.

A study from gobankingrates.com finds the high cost of insurance contributes to Michigan being the most expensive state to own a car.

According to the study, it costs nearly $5,000 annually to own and maintain a vehicle in Michigan, with more than half that cost coming in the form of auto insurance premiums.