Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Movie Review: 'The Black Panthers' Documentary

16 minutes ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Long before Hot Bench, King Solomon reportedly ended a dispute between two women who claimed maternity of the same baby by ordering the child cut in two. But even the wisdom of Solomon would be insufficient to resolve the dispute at the center of Finders Keepers. That's because the foot claimed by two North Carolina men had already been severed from the leg that once hosted it.

When horror auteur Eli Roth broke into the mainstream with Hostel in 2005, he tapped into a primal fear among Americans, post-9/11, that foreign countries were inhospitable to yankees abroad. (The clever, double-meaning title could be read as "hostile.") He also helped open the floodgates for the hard-R subgenre known as "extreme horror" in some circles and "torture porn" in others, depending on where certain critics drew the line—and whether they were willing to have a line at all.

The filmmaker Nancy Meyers dominates a certain Hollywood niche: Her comedies star grown-ups, and they appeal to a grown-up audience. She wrote and directed Something's Gotta Give, It's Complicated, and her latest, The Intern — starring Robert De Niro and Anne Hathaway as the CEO and intern at a startup company. Here's the catch: Anne Hathaway plays the CEO — and at age 70, De Niro's character is the intern. Meyers tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that despite some of the scenes in the movie, they didn't actually have to show De Niro how to use Facebook.

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They're remembered as the sparks for the modern gay-rights movement, but after almost half a century, it's hard to say exactly what happened during the 1969 Stonewall riots. And now Stonewall, a new film interpretation of this history, is fielding backlash even before its Friday opening.

A Visit To The World's First Boozy Taco Bell

17 hours ago

"DO NOT LEAVE THE PREMISES WITH YOUR DRINK," says the woman behind the counter at the Taco Bell Cantina in Chicago. I can tell by the way she looks me in the eye that what she means is this: We finally have booze at Taco Bell. Don't be the guy who ruins it for everybody.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has a big gig on Saturday: He's performing at the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia for an estimated audience of 1.5 million, including, perhaps, Pope Francis.

"I think I might be opening for the popemobile driving in," Gaffigan jokes to Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Stevie Smith's famous poem "Not Waving but Drowning" has been interpreted in many ways since its publication in 1957, and one of those interpretations deals with our ability to see the same thing multiple ways and what that says about our view of reality. It's not entirely clear whether Greg Hrbek had that poem in mind when he called his new book Not on Fire, but Burning.