Education

NPR Ed
3:32 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Shrink The FAFSA? Good Luck With That

Shortening the FAFSA is a tall order.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 4:53 am

Look closely.

Buried deep in President Obama's 2016 budget (page 41) is a proposal to cut up to 30 questions from the Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

The Obama administration has already done a lot to make the FAFSA easier — if not shorter. Online technology now allows students to skip questions that don't apply to them.

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NPR Ed
2:33 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Where Have All The Teachers Gone?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:11 pm

This is the canary in the coal mine.

Several big states have seen alarming drops in enrollment at teacher training programs. The numbers are grim among some of the nation's largest producers of new teachers: In California, enrollment is down 53 percent over the past five years. It's down sharply in New York and Texas as well.

In North Carolina, enrollment is down nearly 20 percent in three years.

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NPR Ed
2:28 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Prepare For 'The End Of College': Here's What Free Higher Ed Looks Like

Kevin Carey'€™s writing has appeared in The New York Times, Slate and The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Amanda Gaines Courtesy of Riverhead

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 4:58 pm

A lot of parents start worrying about paying for college education soon after their child is born. After that, there's the stressful process of applying to colleges, and then, for those lucky enough to get admitted into a good college, there's college debt.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
1:27 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Debate: Do Liberals Stifle Intellectual Diversity On The College Campus?

Two teams face off over the motion, "Liberals Are Stifling Intellectual Diversity On Campus," at the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
Chris Zarconi Intelligence Squared U.S.

There is agreement on both the political left and right that a majority of college professors in the United States are liberal or left-of-center. But do liberals stifle free speech — particularly that of political and social conservatives — on college campuses?

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Education
5:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Ex-Atlanta School Superintendent, Charged In Cheating Case, Dies At 68

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 12:19 pm

Copyright 2015 WABE-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wabe.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Ed
3:34 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Behold The Humble Block! Tools Of The Trade

Bing Nursery School Courtesy of Bing school

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:41 pm

For this series, we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling. Things like the slide rule and protractor, Presidential Fitness Test and Bunsen burner.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Mon March 2, 2015

College: I'll Only Go If I Know (That I Can Afford It)

New research shows that when students think they can afford college, they're more likely to go to college.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 3:43 pm

It's Financial Aid Week here at the NPR Ed Team (not really, but it sure feels like it). And we're kicking things off with a nostalgia nugget for all you children of the '80s.

The old G.I. Joe animated series famously ended with the phrase, "Now I know! And knowing is half the battle."

It's a catchy line and, it turns out, eerily relevant when it comes to high school seniors debating their college options.

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U.S.
3:58 am
Mon March 2, 2015

A Nearly Recession-Proof City Is Not Slowing Down

Lincoln has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in revitalizing its downtown, a historic area called Haymarket, to create a more culturally vibrant urban center that is helping the city keep and attract young adults.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 8:15 am

At 2.5 percent, Lincoln, Neb., has one of the lowest jobless figures in the country. But that's nothing new — the city has ranked at or near the top of the nation, with one of the lowest unemployment rates for years, even during the Great Recession.

But on a recent visit, it's clear that Lincoln is not resting on its laurels. It's working hard at keeping and drawing talent to this city of nearly 300,000.

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NPR Ed
6:15 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Teaching The Holocaust: New Approaches For A New Generation

Ruth Hálová, a survivor of the Holocaust (clockwise): Ruth as a child dressed up for a play; Ruth's 1st grade class taken in 1932; Ruth and husband Milan Hala in India in the 1990's; Ruth and her mother in (the then) Czechoslovakia after the war.
Centropa Photo Archives

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 3:07 pm

Writer and philosopher Hannah Arendt once wrote that, with the German genocide of European Jews, human history "has known no story more difficult to tell."

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, Longtime President Of Notre Dame University, Dies

The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, longtime president of the University of Notre Dame, was influential in reshaping Catholic higher education.
Joe Raymond AP

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:21 pm

The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, a former president of the University of Notre Dame who tangled with the Nixon administration, died late Thursday. He was 97.

For those who knew him, Hesburgh was simply Father Ted. But make no mistake, he was a highly influential priest who moved among presidents and popes. During his 35 years as president of Notre Dome, he reinforced the importance of a college education and urged that it be affordable and accessible to all.

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