Education

NPR Ed
8:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

An Irreplaceable Replacement, This Sub Gets The Job Done

Substitute teacher Josephine Brewington receives the substitute teacher of the year award.
Courtesy of Kelly Services

One of the toughest jobs in education is the substitute teacher. The pay is low, schedules are unpredictable and respect can be hard to come by. But because the average teacher missed 11 days of school in 2012-2013, a sub like Josephine Brewington ends up playing a crucial role.

And this week — Brewington was rewarded for her efforts — winning the 2015 Substitute Teacher of the Year award.

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Goats and Soda
7:36 am
Fri May 22, 2015

How Do You Motivate Kids To Stop Skipping School?

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

It seems like a no-brainer: Offer kids a reward for showing up at school, and their attendance will shoot up. But a recent study of third-graders in a slum in India suggests that incentive schemes can do more harm than good.

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Law
6:13 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

'Be Guardians, Not Warriors': Training A New Generation Of Police

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Education
5:28 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Energy Companies Step In To Fund STEM Education

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 8:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Ed
5:28 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Is Harvard Showing Bias Against Asian-Americans?

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 3:42 pm

A group of more than 60 organizations has filed a complaint with the federal government claiming Harvard holds higher expectations for its Asian applicants than other minorities.

The coalition is made up of nonprofit organizations, including Chinese, Pakistani and Indian groups, and it claims Harvard uses racial quotas to control the number of Asian-Americans on campus.

"Asian-American applicants shouldn't be racially profiled in college admissions," says Swann Lee, a Chinese-American writer from Brookline, Mass. "Asian-Americans should have the playing field leveled."

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NPR Ed
3:31 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Biology Professor's Calling: Teach Deaf Students They Can Do Anything

Caroline Solomon is a professor of biology at Gallaudet University, the renowned school for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 6:04 pm

To get a really good sense of why Caroline Solomon is a great teacher, you have to go into the field with her. On this particular morning, that means a boat on the Anacostia River.

We're about 4 miles from the campus of Gallaudet University, where Solomon is a professor of biology. She and a student — Anna McCall — are heading in a small boat to take water samples.

The Anacostia is no more than 8 miles long, but it meanders through and around Washington, D.C., past a naval yard, a golf course and I-95, the busiest interstate highway on the Eastern Seaboard.

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NPR Ed
5:20 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful ... This Great Teacher Abides By The Scout Law

Romy Vasquez leads the boys in drills ahead of an upcoming Eagle Scout ceremony.
Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 11:32 am

Only a small number of Boy Scouts make Eagle Scout.

The feat is even harder when you come from inner-city poverty.

Yet for 27 years, Romy Vasquez has successfully encouraged boys from South Central Los Angeles to become Scouts, and he has seen more than a dozen members of Troop 780 go on to reach scouting's highest rank.

His pitch: You want to be in a gang? Scouting is the biggest gang in the world.

"It's global," he tells the Scouts. "We got some in Japan, China, Israel, all over. So guess what? You belong to BSA!"

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Religion
5:19 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Rabbis Diversify To Connect To Students; Just Don't Bring Up Israel

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 10:46 pm

Rabbi Evan Goodman runs Hillel, the campus Jewish center, at the University of California, Santa Barbara. In recent years, he's had to rethink his job.

"Years past, when I was in college," he says, the Jewish organization "was a rabbi at a campus that put up a schedule of classes ... and drew the same 10 students to everything all year."

These days, chances are good that half the Jewish students he works with have a parent who's not Jewish. One in three of them says Judaism isn't his or her religion.

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NPR Ed
6:38 am
Tue May 19, 2015

What Do You Do With A Student Who Fidgets?

Studies found that fidgeting can help children with ADHD collect their thoughts.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 1:35 pm

Our story last week about the connection between ADHD, movement and thinking struck a nerve with readers. We reported on a small study in which students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder performed better on memory tasks when they were allowed to spin and move around in a swiveling chair.

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Education
5:22 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

Majority Of Parents Say 'No' To Standardized Tests In One New York District

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 10:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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