Education

The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

White House Announces Campaign Against Campus Sexual Assault

President Obama and Vice President Biden on Friday debuted the "It's On Us" campaign to help colleges and universities prevent and respond to sexual assault on campus.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 2:29 pm

President Obama unveiled a new White House campaign aimed at combating campus sexual assault, saying such violence is "an affront to our basic humanity."

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:17 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Debate: Should Schools Embrace The Common Core?

Education experts faced off on the motion "Embrace the Common Core" at an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate, moderated by John Donvan (center).
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 2:10 pm

More than 40 states have adopted the Common Core State Standards, new national academic benchmarks in reading and math. But the Common Core has become the center of a highly contentious debate nationwide.

Proponents say the Common Core was designed to ensure that children, no matter where they go to school, are prepared to succeed in college or the workplace upon graduation. Opponents argue that many of the standards are not age- or development-appropriate, and that they constrain the ability of teachers to adjust their teaching to their individual classrooms.

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NPR Ed
9:14 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Q&A: A View Of The Common Core From The Principal's Office

Wellesenterprises/iStockphoto

Suburban school principals aren't exactly known as rabble-rousers. In general, they're a pretty sedate bunch — you know, composed, serious, calm.

But if you want to get them riled up, ask them what they think about the Common Core State Standards and how teachers are evaluated.

That's exactly what I did recently: During a visit to Washington, D.C., I sat down with a group of middle and high school principals — members of the National Association of Secondary School Principals — to hear their frontline views of the Common Core.

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NPR Ed
7:47 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Rethinking A Fall Classic: The Parent-Teacher Conference

New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina speaks with students Carlos Cruz and Lluvia Hernandez while visiting a school in Brooklyn earlier this year.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 8:48 am

So now that students have settled in to the routine of the school year, yet another fall education ritual looms: the parent-teacher conference.

And while there's universal agreement that parent involvement is a good thing, these all-too-short meetings are often frustrating on both sides.

Teachers, and parents, often find them too short and too shallow, too likely to focus on problems, with little time to really get beyond test scores and a few bullet points about the curriculum or homework. And, as children get older, fewer parents tend to show up.

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NPR Ed
7:47 am
Thu September 18, 2014

How To Make The Most Of Your 10 Minutes With Teacher

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 9:11 am

So you finally get the chance to meet one on one with your child's teacher — now what?

Like a good Boy Scout, be prepared: Educators agree that doing your homework before a parent-teacher conference can make a big difference.

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NPR Ed
9:14 am
Wed September 17, 2014

These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 12:54 pm

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. "I've applied all kinds of places," she says. "Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless."

Then she got a strange letter in the mail. " 'We are writing you with good news,' " she reads to me over the phone. " 'We got rid of some of your Everest College debt. ... No one should be forced to mortgage their future for an education.' "

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NPR Ed
7:48 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

The NPR Ed Mailbag: Alternative Teacher Certification

LA Johnson/NPR

Last week I reported about Indiana's newest teaching license. Called a "career specialist" license, it allows anyone with a B.A., a B average, and three years of related work experience to become a middle or high school teacher just by passing a content test.

Overall, 1 in 5 teachers now enters the profession through nontraditional means — meaning other than by studying education in a four-year or master's program.

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NPR Ed
2:27 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

'A' Is For Apps: Teachers Share Top Digital Tools Of The Trade

Teachers are incorporating mobile technology and a digital sensibility into classroom lessons with assignments such as this one: to caption a historical photograph for teacher Nicholas Ferroni's high school history class in Union, N.J.
Courtesy of Nicholas Ferroni

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 9:06 am

Nestled between Julia Auster's fantasy football app and Facebook Messenger is a relatively new bucket of apps: the education tools she uses in the French classes she teaches at Robert Adams Middle School in Holliston, Mass.

Auster isn't alone.

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NPR Ed
11:09 pm
Sun September 14, 2014

Q&A: Why Teaching Music Matters

Margaret Martin (right) poses with student Jose Correa during a Harmony Project open house at the Ramon C. Cortines School for Visual and Performing Arts in Los Angeles.
Esteban Rael Harmony Project

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 2:48 pm

I went to Los Angeles to report a story on brain science. A new study had just been released, exploring how music instruction helps kids process language. The children the researchers studied were all participants in a community music program run by the nonprofit Harmony Project.

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The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Sat September 13, 2014

San Diego School District's New 18-Ton Armored Vehicle Creates Stir

The school district has released two renderings of what the MRAP might look like after its tan military color is painted over. In one version, it's police blue; another depicts it as more of an ambulance, white with a red cross.
San Diego Unified School District

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 11:40 am

News that San Diego Unified School District has acquired an MRAP, or mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle, is adding a new facet to discussions about the practice of giving surplus military equipment to civilian agencies.

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