Education

Code Switch
9:23 am
Sun January 18, 2015

Tech Program Helps Put Latinos On A Path To Silicon Valley

CSIT-In-3 students Daniel Diaz (left) and Brian De Anda map out options for reducing the size of a mobile app their team is building.
Krista Almanzan KAZU

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:03 am

About an hour south of Silicon Valley in a classroom at Hartnell Community College, Daniel Diaz and Brian De Anda stand at a whiteboard mapping out ideas on how to reduce the size of a mobile app their team is building.

This isn't a class, and the app they're building — an informational guide for a drug rehab center — isn't even a school project. But this is what it takes to have a chance at an elite summer internship, says Daniel Diaz.

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Education
4:32 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

Duke Backpedals On Allowing Muslim Call To Prayer In Bell Tower

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 7:57 pm

At Duke University on Friday, students gathered on the lawn outside the campus chapel to listen to the Muslim call to prayer. But it did not come from the chapel bell tower. Earlier this week, the university said Muslim students could use the bell tower — but then backtracked after getting threats.

Sports
4:32 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

NCAA To Return Penn State Wins Lost After Sandusky Scandal

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Arizona 1st In Nation To Require High Schoolers To Pass Civics Test

A new U.S. citizen holds an American flag during a naturalization ceremony in July. An Arizona law will require graduating high school seniors to pass the same civics test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:18 am

What year was the Constitution written?

Who was president during World War I?

If you couldn't answer one or both of the above, you might not be able to pass a civics test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. Or (starting in 2017) graduate from high school in Arizona.

On Thursday, Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill making a high school diploma in the state contingent upon students passing the same test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. The class of 2017 will be the first to have the new requirement.

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NPR Ed
5:14 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Do Fictional Geniuses Hold Back Real Women?

Geniuses in movies aren't always played by Benedict Cumberbatch, but they are almost always men.
Weinstein Co./Studiocanal/Kobal Collection

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 8:39 am

The "Lone Genius" character is hot right now in television and movies. Sometimes the genius is real (think Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game), and sometimes he's fictional (think Benedict Cumberbatch in Sherlock). But one thing is almost always certain: He's a guy.

Now one researcher says that gender stereotype in art may have a real impact on women in academia.

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NPR Ed
12:08 am
Thu January 15, 2015

A New Study Reveals Much About How Parents Really Choose Schools

A painted map of the U.S. seen from inside a classroom at Homer A. Plessy Community School, a charter school in New Orleans.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 9:13 am

The charter school movement is built on the premise that increased competition among schools will sort the wheat from the chaff.

It seems self-evident that parents, empowered by choice, will vote with their feet for academically stronger schools. As the argument goes, the overall effect should be to improve equity as well: Lower-income parents won't have to send their kids to an under-resourced and underperforming school just because it is the closest one to them geographically.

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NPR Ed
3:17 am
Wed January 14, 2015

North Carolina Rethinks The Common Core

Math scores at McMichael High School have improved.
Courtesy of McMichael High School

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 10:40 am

It's shaping up to be an interesting year for the Common Core, barely five years after 45 governors embraced it. A few states have already repealed the new math and reading standards. Others are pushing ahead with new tests, curriculum and teaching methods aligned to the Core.

And in some states, its future hangs in the balance. North Carolina is one of them.

It was one of the first states that quietly adopted the Common Core, and it moved quickly to put the standards in place.

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NPR Ed
5:20 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

For-Profit Charters Set To Run Pa. District's Schools

High school students protest the pending state takeover and privatization of the York, Pa. School District.
Emily Previti WITF

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:45 pm

It's been a hectic couple of months for anyone watching the York school district in Pennsylvania. The district is facing a state takeover and may be about to go all-charter, handing control of education to a for-profit company called Charters USA.

It's a drastic response to the dire situation in city's schools, both financially and academically. Test scores are the worst of all Pennsylvania's 500 districts, and the proposed turnover is the latest twist in a long-running controversy over the future of the York schools.

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NPR Ed
4:27 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Grief In The Classroom: 'Saying Nothing Says A Lot'

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 8:02 am

Deborah Oster Pannell's husband died when her son, Josiah, was 6 years old. That week, Pannell visited Josiah's school and, with his teacher and guidance counselor, explained to his first-grade class what had happened.

"I'll never forget the three of us sitting up there — and all these little shining faces looking up at us — talking about how Josiah lost his dad and he might be sad for a while," Pannell says.

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Goats and Soda
4:45 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

The World's Oldest First-Grader Is Honored By A Google Doodle

Kimani Maruge became a first-grader at age 84. The Google doodle shows him in his school uniform.
Courtesy of Google

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 7:13 pm

The Google doodle for Kenya today shows a white-haired man at a table in a primary school, earnestly writing a classroom exercise. The kids behind him grin as if to say, "He is kind of old to be a first-grader."

Well, yes, he is! In 2004, Kimani Maruge went to school for the first time at age 84. Monday marks the 11th anniversary of his first day at school. The Guinness Book of Records says he's the oldest person to enroll in primary school. And who am I to argue?

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