Education

NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu March 5, 2015

The Legacy Of Booker T. Washington Revisited

Tuskegee began in 1881 with 30 students in a rundown church and a shanty. Its early buildings were in such bad shape that on rainy days a student had to hold an umbrella over Washington while he lectured.
LA Johnson/NPR

Let's face it, Booker T. Washington has a serious image problem. He was perhaps the most influential black man in America during the late 1800s, but is often remembered today as being subservient, a sellout even.

Yes, he pursued racial equality with discretion. His famous "Atlanta Compromise" speech of 1895 cautioned blacks against extremism and encouraged them to prove their worth by becoming productive members of society.

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Parallels
3:58 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Berlin, Grassroots Efforts Work To Integrate Inner-City Schools

Young fans of the German national soccer team drink iced tea in July 2010 as they watch the FIFA World Cup semi-final match Germany vs. Spain in an Arabic cafe in Berlin's Neukölln district. The neighborhood has gentrified rapidly in recent years, but many of the white families moving in leave once their children reach school age. Local groups are trying to change that.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 10:11 am

In parts of Berlin, racial segregation in schools is far from official policy, but it is often a reality. In the fast-gentrifying district of Neukölln, young, mainly white professionals usually move away as soon as their kids reach school-age.

But small, parent-led initiatives are working to change this trend and ensure their local schools better reflect the neighborhood.

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NPR Ed
4:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

In LA, Clearing A Backlog Of Aging Instruments

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

There are about 800 schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District, and hundreds of them have music programs. There are jazz bands, choirs, orchestras and marching bands. But for a couple of years, teachers and student musicians have faced a big problem: broken strings, worn-out horns and out-of-tune pianos — a backlog of aging instruments that the district is scrambling to repair and replace.

Instruments like the violin in senior Melissa Valenzuela's hands.

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NPR Ed
11:36 am
Wed March 4, 2015

The Magic Trick That Could Help Students Pay For College

The IRS and the Department of Education have the power to make the FAFSA easier without cutting questions. So why haven't they?
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

Read part one of our reporting on the FAFSA, "Shrink The FAFSA? Good Luck With That"

It's deadline time for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Better known as the FAFSA.

The daunting application — with its 108 questions — stands between many college hopefuls and much-needed financial aid.

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9:54 am
Wed March 4, 2015

One-Quarter of Indiana High School Students Enter College Unprepared

A report out this week finds nearly a quarter of Hoosier high school graduates were not ready for college. That's an improvement from past years, but the state Commission for Higher Education says there is still too many students taking remedial classes at college.
9:53 am
Wed March 4, 2015

How Can Indiana Improve the ISTEP Exam Next Year?

Students across Indiana are in the middle of taking the spring ISTEP+ - a shorter test than was expected, thanks to quick action from state officials, guided by two national consultants. Gov. Mike Pence released Edward Roeber and Bill Auty's full review of the test Monday.
NPR Ed
3:32 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Shrink The FAFSA? Good Luck With That

Shortening the FAFSA is a tall order.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri March 6, 2015 9:58 am

Look closely.

Buried deep in President Obama's 2016 budget (Page 41) is a proposal to cut up to 30 questions from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

The Obama administration has already done a lot to make the FAFSA easier — if not shorter. Online technology now allows students to skip questions that don't apply to them.

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NPR Ed
2:33 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Where Have All The Teachers Gone?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

This is the canary in the coal mine.

Several big states have seen alarming drops in enrollment at teacher training programs. The numbers are grim among some of the nation's largest producers of new teachers: In California, enrollment is down 53 percent over the past five years. It's down sharply in New York and Texas as well.

In North Carolina, enrollment is down nearly 20 percent in three years.

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NPR Ed
2:28 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Prepare For 'The End Of College': Here's What Free Higher Ed Looks Like

Kevin Carey'€™s writing has appeared in The New York Times, Slate and The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Amanda Gaines Courtesy of Riverhead

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 4:58 pm

A lot of parents start worrying about paying for college education soon after their child is born. After that, there's the stressful process of applying to colleges, and then, for those lucky enough to get admitted into a good college, there's college debt.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
1:27 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Debate: Do Liberals Stifle Intellectual Diversity On The College Campus?

Two teams face off over the motion, "Liberals Are Stifling Intellectual Diversity On Campus," at the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
Chris Zarconi Intelligence Squared U.S.

There is agreement on both the political left and right that a majority of college professors in the United States are liberal or left-of-center. But do liberals stifle free speech — particularly that of political and social conservatives — on college campuses?

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