Education

The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

11 Former Atlanta Public School Employees Found Guilty In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 3:22 pm

Eleven of 12 former public school employees in Atlanta were found guilty of racketeering in what is thought to be the biggest cheating scandal in American education, NPR member station WABE reports.

One defendant, teacher Dessa Curb, was acquitted of all charges, according to WSB-TV's Richard Elliot.

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NPR Ed
5:30 am
Wed April 1, 2015

The Opposite Of The Dean's List

The Education Department, headed by Secretary Arne Duncan, says it's keeping a close eye on 556 colleges and universities that do a poor job of complying with federal regulations and handling federal financial aid.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 5:22 pm

No school wants to be on this list.

It was just released by the Department of Education. On it are the names of 556 colleges and universities that failed the department's "financial responsibility test."

Undersecretary of Education Ted Mitchell says that each school's finances are now being placed under a microscope because the government "had serious concerns about the financial integrity of the institution or its administrative capacity."

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NPR Ed
5:38 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

Activists Stop Paying Their Student Loans

Makenzie Vasquez (from left), Pamala Hunt, Latonya Suggs, Ann Bowers, Nathan Hornes, Ashlee Schmidt, Natasha Hornes, Tasha Courtright, Michael Adorno and Sarah Dieffenbacher are refusing to pay back loans they took out to attend Corinthian Colleges.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 11:03 am

Latonya Suggs says she borrowed thousands of dollars in student loans to attend the for-profit Corinthian Colleges but has nothing to show for it. Most employers don't recognize her criminal justice degree.

"I am completely lost and in debt," Suggs says. And now she's doing something about it: She's refusing to pay back those loans.

Suggs and 106 other borrowers now saddled with Corinthian loan debt say their refusal to repay the loans is a form of political protest. And Tuesday, the U.S. government gave them an audience.

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Education
4:46 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

Students From Troubled For-Profit Colleges Refuse To Pay Back Loans

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 2:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Live From Small Town America: Teachers Who Blog To Stay In Touch

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 1:53 pm

Katie Morrow became a teacher, among other things, because of wanderlust.

"I'm going to be a teacher because I can go anywhere in the world," she thought.

She's originally from a small town in Nebraska called O'Neill, population 3,700. "In the middle of nowhere, literally," she says.

So where did she end up teaching? Right back in O'Neill. She fell in love with a hometown boy and ended up at O'Neill's only public school. It's K-12, with 750 students.

Morrow teaches middle-school English; she's also a technology integration specialist.

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NPR Ed
3:10 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Revolving Door Of Teachers Costs Schools Billions Every Year

Nearly half of all beginning teachers will leave their classrooms within five years, only to be replaced by another fresh-faced educator.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 4:57 pm

Every year, thousands of fresh-faced teachers are handed the keys to a new classroom, given a pat on the back and told, "Good luck!"

Over the next five years, though, nearly half of those teachers will transfer to a new school or leave the profession altogether — only to be replaced with similarly fresh-faced teachers.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Saying Goodbye: Reflections Of A Music Teacher

Jackie Zielke and eighth-grader Chartreanna Watson practice a guitar duet at Brady Middle School in Pepper Pike, Ohio.
Savion Gissentaner

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 1:58 pm

This weekend, NPR Ed is featuring dispatches from teachers about the ups and downs of their work.

Early each December, the HR department of Orange City Schools in Pepper Pike, Ohio, places a checklist in our mailboxes. It asks about our employment plans for the next school year. Choices include sabbatical leave, acquiring advanced degrees, and the one everyone dreams of checking: I will be retiring at the end of the current school year.

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The Salt
6:01 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Guess What Makes The Cut As A 'Smart Snack' In Schools? Hot Cheetos

Frito-Lay reformulated Flamin' Hot Cheetos, a perennial favorite among school kids, to meet new federal "Smart Snack" rules for schools.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 4:07 pm

Flamin' Hot Cheetos might conjure a lot of descriptors: spicy, crunchy, unnaturally fiery red. But it's a good bet that "healthy" didn't exactly spring to mind.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

University Of Oklahoma: Racist Chant Learned At National Frat Event

University of Oklahoma President David Boren talks with the media before the start of a Board of Regents meeting in Oklahoma City earlier this month in which the SAE fraternity issue was to be discussed.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 4:36 pm

The president of the University of Oklahoma says two dozen students from the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity have been disciplined for taking part in a racist chant about African-Americans and lynching that was videotaped and went viral earlier this month.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Stretching One Great Teacher Across Many Classrooms

At Nashville's Bailey Middle Prep, Whitney Bradley teaches her 8th-graders how to organize an essay in preparation for the writing section of Tennessee's standardized test. Most in her class trail their peers in literacy.
Blake Farmer Nashville Public Radio

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 11:55 pm

A stack of research suggests that all the classroom technology in the world can't compare to the power of a great teacher. And, since we haven't yet figured out how to clone our best teachers, a few schools around the country are trying something like it: Stretching them across multiple classrooms.

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