Education

The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

California College Students Walk Out Of Class To Protest Tuition Hikes

Students shout their disapproval after the University of California Board of Regents voted Nov. 20 to raise tuition. UC students across the state protested Monday by walking out of class.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 9:05 pm

Students in the University of California system staged walkouts on campuses throughout the state Monday, in response to proposed tuition hikes at their schools. Last week, the UC Board of Regents voted for hikes of up to 5 percent a year, for the next five years, unless state funding is increased. California Gov. Jerry Brown has come out against the tuition increases, and as a UC regent himself, he also voted against the measure. But the regents approved the hike in a 14-7 vote.

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Tools Of The Trade
3:22 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Tools Of The Trade: The Presidential Physical Fitness Test

Patches for the new Presidential Youth Fitness Program in Lauren Horton's office at Capital City Public Charter School in Washington, D.C.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

For this series, we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling. Things like the slide rule and protractor, recorder and Bunsen burner.

Mere mention of today's tool sends shivers up the spines of entire generations — the tool long used to measure physical fitness: the Presidential Physical Fitness Test.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Sat November 22, 2014

UVA Bans Fraternities Until January In Wake Of Campus Rape Article

Saying she is acting out of ""great sorrow, great rage," University of Virginia President Teresa Sullivan, seen here in April, is suspending all the school's fraternities until January.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Sat November 22, 2014 6:00 pm

Citing "great sorrow, great rage" and "great determination," University of Virginia President Teresa A. Sullivan says she's suspending all the school's fraternities until Jan. 9. The move comes days after a Rolling Stone article in which a woman described being gang-raped when she was a freshman in 2012.

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The Two-Way
4:46 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Texas Education Panel OKs New History, Social Studies Textbooks

The Texas State Board of Education has voted to approve the use of 89 history and social studies books across the state.

The 10-5 vote in the Republican-controlled panel was along party lines. The Texas Tribune has more:

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NPR Ed
4:23 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Texas Hits The Books

LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 8:51 pm

In the education world, all eyes were on Texas Friday.

For the first time since 2002, the Texas State Board of Education voted to adopt a new generation of social studies products. That includes some 89 textbooks, workbooks and other classroom materials. The vote matters because, with about 5 million students, the state has a big impact on the national textbook market.

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Law
6:30 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

New Affirmative Action Cases Say Policies Hurt Asian-Americans

Edward Blum announces the filing of two lawsuits on Monday, challenging the alleged racial preference admissions policies of Harvard and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 12:22 pm

If you go to HarvardNotFair.org, you'll find yourself on a page that says this: Were You Denied Admission to Harvard? It may be because you're the wrong race.

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NPR Ed
4:08 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Why Working With Young Children Is (Still) A Dead-End Job

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 3:54 pm

Right now, at preschool programs around the country, teachers are tapping infinite reserves of patience to keep the peace among children at various stages of development and need. They're also providing meals, wiping noses and delivering a curriculum in math and reading that will get the kids ready for school.

And there are hugs. Lots of hugs.

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It's All Politics
1:18 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Jeb Bush Stands Firm On Common Core But Softens Tone

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush addresses an education conference Thursday sponsored by the Foundation for Excellence in Education, a nonprofit he created as he left office.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 3:06 pm

Former Florida GOP Gov. Jeb Bush defended the Common Core education standards Thursday, but offered an olive branch to Republican activists who oppose them and are making them a litmus test for potential 2016 presidential candidates.

Bush's longtime support has put him crosswise with part of the Republican base. He said that he finds the new angst over Common Core "troubling," but that there is room for disagreement among those who more generally support school reform.

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NPR Ed
3:46 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Are NOLA Schools Failing Students With Disabilities?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:28 am

In New Orleans, schools have long struggled to provide for students with physical, emotional and mental disabilities. Even before Hurricane Katrina, many parents had to fight for extra help. But many say things have only gotten harder since the city's public school district shifted almost entirely to charter schools.

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New Boom
4:37 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

For Millions Of Millennials: Some College, No Degree, Lots Of Debt

Noelle Johnson has a lengthy commute via bus and train to her job near Washington, D.C. She's been working toward her B.A. for nine years, and when she finally finishes, she says, she'll be able to afford to live closer to work.
James Clark NPR

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 5:38 pm

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

If Noelle Johnson had a bachelor's degree, she'd be able to live closer to work, she says. She wouldn't have to spend so much of her free time hustling for baby-sitting gigs. She'd shop at the farmers market. She'd be able to treat her sister to dinner for once. She and her husband could go on trips together — they'd be able to afford two tickets instead of one.

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