Education

NPR Ed
4:58 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Dissecting A Frog: A Middle School Rite Of Passage

This is a vintage frog dissection diagram.
Flikr Creative Commons

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 11:30 am

For this series, we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling. Things like the slide rule and protractor, the Presidential Fitness Test and wooden blocks.

Read more
NPR Ed
7:08 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Preventing Suicide With A 'Contagion Of Strength'

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 10:32 am

For Whitney Bischoff, high school was tough. On the first day of her freshman year, a childhood friend committed suicide. Things weren't any better at home — her father died when she was 7 and her mom was an alcoholic with an abusive boyfriend.

She had a hard time making friends.

And when all the stress threatened to overwhelm her, she, too, considered suicide.

"I thought family was everything," Bischoff says. "I thought, if I didn't have family support – what am I going to do? Suicide seemed like the only way out."

Read more
NPR Ed
4:50 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

College? Career Tech? In Nashville, Teens Do Both

John Scarborough, a fourth-year pharmacy student at Lipscomb University, talks to high schoolers during a vocational career training class.
Courtesy of Lipscomb University

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

Schools don't like to use the V-word anymore — "vocational," as in "vocational education." Administrators say the word is outdated, along with the idea of offering job-training courses only to students who are going straight into the workforce.

Nashville, Tenn., is trying a new approach. The public school system there is encouraging every high school student, regardless of college plans, to take three career-training classes before they graduate.

Read more
NPR Ed
12:33 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

The Great U.S. History Battle

American boys re-enact George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River in 1776.
Jack Fletcher National Geographic

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:04 pm

William Faulkner wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." And that's never more true than when people start arguing over how American history should be taught in school.

The current fight involves the Advanced Placement U.S. history exam. Nearly half a million high school students took the test last year, hoping to earn college credit.

Read more
NPR Ed
3:48 am
Tue February 24, 2015

In LA, Missing Kindergarten Is A Big Deal

Hugo Villavicencio talks to kindergarten students at Lenicia B. Weemes Elementary School about the importance of attending school.
Benjamin Brayfield Southern California Public Radio/KPCC

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:33 pm

In kindergarten, kids are learning really important stuff. Basic reading skills. Numbers and math concepts. And to keep from falling behind, one of the major things they need to do is make it to school every day.

In Los Angeles, the nation's second-largest school district, kindergarten absence is a big problem, with some students missing 10, 20, 30 days or more. In 2012, district officials say that almost 10,000 students were chronically absent from kindergarten. Last year that number improved, but only slightly.

Read more
Education
6:54 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Advanced Placement History Test Accused Of Being Unpatriotic

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 11:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
NPR Ed
5:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

How We Talk About Our Teachers

For his study Professor Benjamin Schmidt culled roughly 14 million reviews from the website Rate My Professor. Blue dots represent male professors, red dots female. The farther right the dot, the more often that the word on the left was used to describe the professor.
Alyson Hurt

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:57 pm

Male professors are far more likely to be considered "smart" or "brilliant" by their students, according to an analysis of reviews from the website Rate My Professor.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:27 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

When Pot Goes From Illegal To Recreational, Schools Face A Dilemma

Schools in Colorado are trying to find effective ways to teach the health effects of marijuana use. "When it's legal for your parents to smoke it or grow it," says one educator, "that changes the conversation."
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 11:21 am

Like many schools across Colorado, Arapahoe Ridge High School in Boulder has seen an increase in overall drug incidents since recreational marijuana became legal.

While public schools aren't required to report marijuana incidents separately from other drugs such as cocaine, evidence compiled by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News suggests more students are using marijuana.

Read more
Education
8:29 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Imagining The Future: 'Howard Project' Students Look Forward

"Howard Project" participants (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Ariel Alford and Leighton Watson in the Howard University library.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:36 pm

In some ways, the questions young people grapple with are universal: Who are you? What's important to you? What kind of life do you want?

But at the same time, those questions are profoundly shaped by each person's experience.

As part of an ongoing conversation on Weekend Edition, four college seniors at a historically black university in Washington, D.C., are sharing insight into their experiences — both shared and individual.

Read more
NPR Ed
5:58 am
Sun February 22, 2015

If Your Teacher Likes You, You Might Get A Better Grade

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:59 am

Were you ever the teacher's pet? Or did you just sit behind the teacher's pet and roll your eyes from time to time?

A newly published paper suggests that personality similarity affects teachers' estimation of student achievement. That is, how much you are like your teacher contributes to his or her feelings about you — and your abilities.

Read more

Pages