Green

The Salt
7:39 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Will Environmentalists Fall For Faux Fish Made From Plants?

Chef James Corwell's nigiri sushi rolls made with Tomato Sushi, a plant-based tuna alternative, in San Francisco.
Alastair Bland for NPR

It's a dead ringer for Ahi tuna sashimi. It cuts into glistening slivers that are firm and juicy. And it's got a savory bite.

But this flesh-like food is not fish. It's made of tomato, and it's what San Francisco chef James Corwell hopes could be one small step toward saving imperiled species of fish, like bluefin tuna.

"What I want is to create a great sushi experience without the tuna," Corwell tells The Salt.

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The Two-Way
7:04 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

'Modern Farmer' Owner Says It Will Live On, Despite Staff Exit

Modern Farmer has a particular fondness for stories about anything having to do with goats.
Courtesy of Modern Farmer

A hip chronicle of ag life isn't dead yet, the owner of Modern Farmer says. The National Magazine Award winner lost its last paid editorial staff Friday, The New York Times reports. But the story comes with a clarification: Modern Farmer's owner says he'll publish again this summer.

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Environment
9:47 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Ecologist's Airborne Scanners See The Forest And The Trees — All Of Them

A scan produced by Gregory Asner's airborne, laser-and-spectrometer-equipped lab.
Courtesy Gregory Asner

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 10:02 am

In today's world it can be easy to feel like there's nothing left to discover, that all the blank bits of the map have long been filled. Gregory Asner begs to differ, and he's developed a lab in the sky to prove it.

In the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, Asner has designed a one-of-a-kind, ultra high-tech, airborne laboratory — inside a twin-turboprop plane. It offers a faster, more exhaustive way to map how humans have destroyed land, from the deserts of the American southwest to the deepest depth of the Amazon.

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The Salt
7:03 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Investment Fund Pours Cash Into Cleaner, Greener Fish Farming

World Resource Institute

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 9:21 pm

Like it or not, our seafood increasingly originates not in the deep ocean but on fish farms hugging the coasts. Aquaculture already supplies about half of the world's seafood, and global production is going to have to more than double by 2050 to meet demand, according to the World Resources Institute.

The business opportunity here is tremendous. Thousands of operations around the world now produce huge numbers of salmon, shrimp, mussels, tilapia and catfish, to name a few fish species that thrive on farms.

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Cities Project
3:32 am
Thu January 22, 2015

Building Sponge City: Redesigning LA For Long-Term Drought

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 5:44 pm

For thousands of years, city planners have engineered water into submission — think aqueducts.

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Economy
4:09 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

U.S. Solar Industry Sees Growth, But Also Some Uncertainty

A worker installs solar panels atop a government building in Lakewood, Colo. The industry has added more than 80,000 jobs since 2010, according to The Solar Foundation.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:32 pm

The solar energy business is growing fast, thanks in part to a steep drop in panel prices.

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Environment
4:22 am
Mon January 19, 2015

New Justice Department Environment Chief Takes Helm Of Gulf Spill Case

Cruden ranks the Gulf oil spill as one of the most significant environmental disasters of our time. It "deserves ... all of our energy to make sure nothing like this ever happens again," he says.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:37 am

John Cruden served with U.S. Special Forces in Vietnam, taking his law school aptitude test in Saigon and eventually becoming a government lawyer.

Earlier this month, he started a new job running the environment and natural resources division at the Justice Department. For Cruden, 68, the new role means coming home to a place where he worked as a career lawyer for about 20 years.

Cruden has been around long enough to have supervised the Exxon Valdeez spill case, a record-setter. That is, until the Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

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Goats and Soda
3:35 pm
Sat January 17, 2015

MTV Pimps Cars, Brazil Pimps Trash Carts

A waste picker wheels a trash cart with Mundano's art and spreads the word: "My cart doesn't pollute."
Courtesy of Mundano

The carts that garbage pickers wheel down the streets of Sao Paulo often look as if they came from the Museum of Funky Art. Colorful cartoon faces — with bulging eyes, flared nostrils and thick lips — peer from the sides of the metal and wooden carts.

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Fri January 16, 2015

It's Official: 2014 Was The Hottest Year On Record, NOAA Says

January–December 2014 blended land and sea surface temperature anomalies in degrees Celsius.
NOAA

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:17 am

It's official: 2014 was the hottest year on record.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center crunched the numbers and came to this conclusion:

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Environment
4:51 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

New EPA Guidelines Limit Methane Release From Drilling

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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