Green

U.S.
5:27 pm
Sun April 26, 2015

Oklahoma Now Has More Earthquakes Than California

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
5:27 pm
Sun April 26, 2015

As California's Economy Reels From Drought, At Least One Industry Is Doing Fine

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 6:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Scientists Discover Massive New Magma Chamber Under Yellowstone

The Grand Prismatic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park is among the park's myriad hydrothermal features created by the fact that Yellowstone is a supervolcano.
Robert B. Smith AP

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 5:14 pm

There's more to Yellowstone National Park than meets the eye. Much more, as it turns out.

You might already know that a supervolcano dominates the famous park that is situated on land in Wyoming and Montana. A shallow subsurface magma chamber has long been known.

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U.S.
5:02 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

What's That Smell? The Beautiful Tree That's Causing Quite A Stink

Callery pear trees in Pittsburgh. The smell of the invasive trees has been compared to rotting fish and other stinky things.
Luke H. Gordon Flickr

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:33 pm

It's springtime in Pittsburgh, and throughout the city, Callery pear trees are sprouting beautiful, white blossoms.

But that's just the problem. Simply put, these trees stink.

"This whole place smells like dead fish," says Sheila Titus. "I mean everywhere. Everywhere you see one of these trees with the white on them."

Titus has lived in her home in the now-hip neighborhood of Lawrenceville for 49 years. Two decades ago, her grandson and his 7th grade class planted a row of Callery pears across the street from her house.

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Environment
5:02 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

California Cities Struggle To Meet Water Conservation Targets

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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TED Radio Hour
9:49 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Why Don't Ants Need A Leader?

"We could learn a lot from ants about how effective a noisy, messy system could be." — Deborah Gordon
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Deborah Gordon's TED Talk

The world's largest ant colony stretches over 3,700 miles. It succeeds, biologist Deborah Gordon says, because no one is in charge. The ants communicate with algorithmic patterns to survive and thrive.

About Deborah Gordon

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Around the Nation
4:25 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why

Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 2:25 pm

A magnitude-3.0 earthquake is small, but most people can feel it. Historically, Oklahoma got less than two of those a year, but in 2013 it became two a week.

It's only gotten more active since then — last year, the state had three times as many earthquakes as in the entire seismically active state of California.

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The Salt
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

A cherry tree and its blossoms are covered with snow in an orchard near Traverse City, Mich. Three years ago, almost every fruit crop in Michigan was frozen out when cold temperatures followed some 80 degree days in March.
John L. Russell AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Fruit growers in northern Michigan grow apples, peaches and wine grapes. But the big crop here is tart cherries.

More than half of Ken Engle's 140-acre farm is planted with what he calls sour cherries.

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It's All Politics
7:06 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Visiting The Everglades, Obama Takes Swipe At Climate Change Deniers

"Part of the reason we're here is because climate change is threatening this treasure and the communities that depend on it," Obama said Wednesday of his visit to Everglades National Park in Florida. "If we don't act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it."
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama used the backdrop of the Florida Everglades this Earth Day to highlight the dangers posed by a changing climate. He also took a swipe at Florida's Republican governor, who's been accused of discouraging state workers from discussing global warming.

"Climate change can no longer be denied," Obama said. "It can't be edited out. It can't be omitted from the conversation. And action can no longer be delayed."

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The Salt
6:47 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower.
Albin Andersson/Nature

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:58 am

It has been about a decade since beekeepers and scientists began documenting a decline in honeybee populations and other important pollinators.

Even if you're not a lover of bees or honey, you should know that bees are critically important to our food supply. They help pollinate billions of dollars of crops each year, from apples and carrots to blueberries and almonds.

So if bees are threatened, ultimately, the production of these crops will be threatened, too.

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