Health & Science

Shots - Health News
4:57 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

One Man's Race To Outrun Alzheimer's

Greg O'Brien gathers his thoughts before a run in 2013. "Running is essential," he says.
Michael Strong Living With Alzheimers

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:21 pm

This is the third in NPR's series "Inside Alzheimer's," about the experience of living with the illness. In parts one and two, Greg O'Brien talked about what it was like to get the diagnosis of Alzheimer's, and how he thinks about the future.

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Goats and Soda
11:53 am
Sat February 28, 2015

While New England Gets Snow, West Africa Gets Sand

The Harmattan haze can become so dense in Dakar, Senegal, it dims the sun and grounds flights.
Joe Penney Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 2:11 pm

Would you kindly bear with me a little while I have a good old moan, please? I'm feeling rather wretched. No, not because I've finally kicked a lingering lurgy that turned out to be bronchitis and stole my voice. But because one of the reasons I blame for the illness is back: the Harmattan.

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Animals
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Researchers Examine The Ways Of Southern Coyotes

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Copyright 2015 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.gpb.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Science
4:43 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains.
Greg Allen NPR

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

In Florida, archaeologists are investigating a site that a century ago sparked a scientific controversy. Today, it's just a strip of land near an airport.

But in 1915, it was a spot that became world-famous because of the work of Elias Sellards, Florida's state geologist. Sellards led a scientific excavation of the site, where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized animal bones and then, human remains.

Andy Hemmings of Mercyhurst University is the lead archaeologist on a project that has picked up where Sellards left off a century ago.

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Humans
4:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

A Neuroscientist Weighs In: Why Do We Disagree On The Color Of The Dress?

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:13 pm

Robert Siegel speaks with Dr. Bevil Conway, a neuroscientist at Wellesley College, about the dress that has the whole Internet asking: What color is it?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Salt
1:52 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

When Food Is Too Good To Waste, College Kids Pick Up The Scraps

Student volunteers with The Campus Kitchens Project evaluate produce. The initiative gets high-school and college students to scavenge food from cafeterias, grocery stores and farmers' markets, cook it and deliver it to organizations serving low-income people in their communities.
Courtesy of DC Central Kitchen

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 4:57 pm

Back in 2011 when I was a student at the University of Maryland in College Park I once noticed a massive pile of trash in front of a dining hall. A closer look revealed that it was mostly food — a half-eaten sandwich, a browning apple and what appeared to be the remains of the day's lunch special.

The heap was gross, but intriguing. Turned out it was a stunt to get students thinking about how much food they throw out each day.

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Shots - Health News
1:07 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Parents Choose A Simple Device To Reshape A Baby's Ear

Before and after photos of an ear shaped with the EarWell device.
Courtesy of Becon Medical, Ltd.

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 3:24 pm

Soon after giving birth to a baby girl, Jennifer McMullen noticed that one of her daughter's ears looked a little different.

"She had a condition called lidding, where the top part of the cartilage in the ear is basically folded over so the top ridge is kind of rounded over," McMullen tells Shots. Her daughter could hear just fine, but McMullen worried about bullying when she got older. "She's a beautiful baby girl," she says. "If she plays sports, I don't want her to be self-conscious pulling her hair back or anything like that."

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Science
12:11 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

U.S. Biologists Keen To Explore, Help Protect Cuba's Wild Places

Shoal of tropical fish over a coral reef in the Caribbean Sea. From pristine forests to vivid reefs, Cuba "has it all," say ecologists eager to study the island habitats.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:13 pm

As diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba thaw, the island could see a new wave of tourism — with visitors treated to music and scenery that has been closed to most U.S. residents for more than half a century.

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Shots - Health News
11:18 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Fines Remain Rare Even As Health Data Breaches Multiply

ProPublica

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 2:25 pm

In a string of meetings and press releases, the federal government's health watchdogs have delivered a stern message: They are cracking down on insurers, hospitals and doctors offices that don't adequately protect the security and privacy of medical records.

"We've now moved into an area of more assertive enforcement," Leon Rodriguez, then-director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Civil Rights, warned at a privacy and security forum in December 2012.

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Goats and Soda
10:11 am
Fri February 27, 2015

It Kills Germs For Up To 6 Hours. Can It Wipe Out Ebola?

A health worker in Liberia washes up after leaving a clinic's Ebola isolation area.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 7:59 pm

Clean hands go a long way toward preventing the spread of many illnesses, including Ebola. But finding the right hand-wash to impede deadly germs is tricky.

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