Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

More than 700 Indiana students received a certificate of multilingual proficiency from the state, meaning the students are proficient in two languages.

The Department of Education awarded this certificate, and this is the first cohort of students receiving the recognition.

Ex-Indiana Schools Chief Opens School Board Consulting Business

May 19, 2017

Glenda Ritz, Indiana’s former Superintendent of Public Instruction, will soon work on education matters in a new role. She now leads Advancing Public Schools as president and CEO.

The company’s mission is “dedicated to advancing the nation’s public school system through partnerships with local school boards in the areas of advocacy and literacy,” according to their website.

HIV/STD Conference Keeps Shapes Prevention Strategies

May 19, 2017

Health providers, public health leaders and other treatment professionals from around Indiana gathered in Indianapolis for the 2017 HIV/STD Update. The annual conference allows people working in and around the field of infectious disease to come together, hear from national and state leaders and shape strategy.

Medical director at the Bell Flower STD Clinic, Dr. Janet Arno, says the event can help keep the conversation updated.

Road construction season is underway, and after state lawmakers allocated more money for local roads, House Speaker Brian Bosma says communities should see a big season.

“We want them to start smelling asphalt in July,” Bosma said after unveiling the road funding package in April.

Indiana’s local communities will receive at least $200 million for roads and bridges in the state’s new infrastructure funding package.

Indiana Unemployment Rate Lowest Since Early 2001

May 19, 2017

The unemployment rate declined in April for the second consecutive month, down 0.3 of a percent to 3.6 percent. That’s the biggest single month drop since late 2010. And 3.6 percent is the lowest rate since February 2001.

But the Hoosier private sector lost 9,300 jobs last month. That’s the largest single month decline since June 2009. The losses were led by the manufacturing and private educational and health services sectors. And the private sector has now shed jobs four of the last five months.

A who’s-who of Midwest business leaders met in Indianapolis Thursday to talk about their stake in fixing updating the nation’s aging transportation system.

Many say Indiana’s plans for road repairs should stand as a national, multi-modal example.

Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper, who helped host the roundtable discussion, says the state and national economies rely on more than ships and barges. Changes at one part of the system, he says, have huge ripple effects on the rest.

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a bill Thursday providing aid for a lead contaminated neighborhood in East Chicago, Indiana.

House Bill 1344 expands lead testing in the soil and water of the USS Lead Superfund site in East Chicago. At the bill signing in East Chicago, Holcomb says nothing could be more important than getting the city back on track.

“From the street to your Statehouse to the White House, we are going to make sure East Chicago stays on track,” says Holcomb.

McCormick: ‘Concern’ 2 SBOE Seats Still Vacant

May 18, 2017

As two seats sit vacant on Indiana’s education policy-creating body, the state’s highest-ranking education official is concerned.

As Gary Community Schools prepares for a state-hired emergency manager to take control, the seat on the state education board that represents the district remains vacant.

The same goes for East Chicago Schools as it faces a lead contamination crisis in the community.

Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

Indiana’s corn and soybean growers are getting seeds in the ground this week – but more rain on the way could put farmers in a difficult position.

As of Monday, 56 percent of the state’s projected corn crop and 23 percent of the projected soybean crop have been planted.


Indiana Center for Evaluation and Education Policy

A new study shows Indiana’s schools are segregated by race and income, something that’s true across the state.

The study comes from Indiana University’s Center for Evaluation & Education Policy, and focuses on how students from different races and economic backgrounds intersect.

American Fitness Index Measures More Than Health

May 16, 2017

The American College of Sports Medicine in Indianapolis released its annual American Fitness Index this week. The index was first created 10 years ago when it was the first report to combine personal and community factors into a health score, having that environment included has changed the conversation.

Friday marked the official end to Indianapolis-based Anthem’s bid to merge with Cigna, and the second time in recent months a major health insurance merger has failed.

It underscores the uphill regulatory battle that big health insurers face in trying to join forces.

Anti-trust officials blocked mergers between Humana and Aetna, and Anthem and Cigna this year. Those four have something in common: they’re among their industry’s biggest, top-earning companies.

Girls of color are much more likely than white girls to be suspended from Indiana schools and schools nationwide, according to a new report.

Indiana schools suspend about one in nine black girls, one in 29 Latina girls and one in 50 white girls, according to the report from the National Women’s Law Center.

ISDH Launches County Profiles To Fight Opioid Epidemic

May 15, 2017

A new tool from the Indiana State Department of Health aims to help counties determine how best to respond to the opioid epidemic. Those profiles, released Monday, offer a view of how the opioid epidemic is impacting Indiana communities, county by county.

ISDH deputy commissioner Pam Pontones says the information is not meant to rank counties or serve as a comparison but rather to give counties a snapshot of their risks and trends.

Pages