Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) was one of a bipartisan group of senators that brokered the deal to re-open the government after a three-day shutdown.

Non-essential operations were suspended Saturday when Congress failed to pass a budget to keep the federal government moving. The deadlock ended Monday after the Senate passed a short-term spending bill after Republicans promised a future vote on immigration policies.

Senate Committee Begins Debate On Hate Crimes Bill

Jan 23, 2018

Debate on a hate crimes bill was emotional and, at times, heated Tuesday as a Senate committee kicked off conversation on the issue.

Indiana is one of five states without a hate, or bias crimes, law. The legislation would allow judges to impose harsher sentences if a crime was committed in part because of a victim’s characteristics – such as race, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

Indiana’s unemployment rate went down in December, the second consecutive month it’s fallen.

The rate fell to 3.4 percent last month. That represents a drop of half of a percent since October.

Helping that drop in December: the private sector added 6,000 jobs, led by the manufacturing industry.

Both Sides Of Abortion Debate Organize In Indianapolis

Jan 22, 2018

People on both sides of the abortion issue made their voices heard at the Indiana Statehouse today and young Hoosiers were well represented.

Hundreds of pro-life supporters from around the state attended a march and rally event in Indianapolis Monday. While a national rally has been held in Washington for many years, this was the first time the event was organized in Indiana.

Anna Allgaier, regional coordinator for Students for Life of America, says Hoosier youth are pro-life.

Senator Young Applauds End To Filibuster

Jan 22, 2018

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) applauded the 81 senators who approved a move Monday to re-open the government – this vote ended the filibuster, making way for a short-term spending bill through Feb. 8.

Young also expressed his frustration saying the shutdown was “an indictment” on senators who sought protection for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA recipients.

“Now I think, all parties, including the Democratic leaders, are prepared to negotiate in the coming weeks,” Young says.

He says this is a call to action for Congress.

Senate, House Pass School Funding Measures

Jan 22, 2018

Late last year, the state revealed a surprise uptick of public school student enrollment, which led to a multi-million dollar gap in funding. Now, two bills to fix the nearly $16 million funding shortfall for this year has been approved – one in the House, and one in the Senate.

Lawmakers estimate enrollment numbers to figure out how much to set aside for school funding during budget sessions, but last year’s numbers turned out to be off the mark due to an unexpected surge of students enrolling in public schools.


The Indiana House easily approved legislation Monday to ensure local governments can’t ban short-term rentals through platforms such as Airbnb.

The overwhelmingly approval comes just one year after similar legislation couldn’t muster enough votes in that chamber.

Rep. Matt Lehman (R-Berne), the bill’s author in both 2017 and this year, says he believes he’s found a good compromise.

The Indiana Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill Monday to legalize Sunday alcohol carryout sales. It’s the first time the Senate has ever approved such legislation.

Sunday sales has historically been a highly controversial issue at the Statehouse. It’s never so much as passed a Senate committee before this year, let alone the whole chamber. Yet there was no debate on the measure Monday.

Legislation that would define how to evaluate the quality of legislative redistricting maps is headed to the Senate floor after unanimous committee approval Monday.

The bill’s Republican author calls it the “best chance” to move the redistricting reform debate forward, even as advocates say it should go further.

Mapping The Brain: Alzheimer's Research In Indiana

Jan 21, 2018

Much is still unknown about Alzheimer’s, a disease that will impact half the population if you live that long. There are no pharmaceutical treatments. Doctors cannot make a definitive diagnosis until after death, with an autopsy. Research participants are in short supply.

Advances in brain imaging offer some hope, and a key piece of that work is being done in Indiana.

Dr. Martin Farlow is a researcher at Indiana University’s Department of Neurology in Indianapolis.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos approved Indiana’s plan to adhere to the federal Every Student Succeeds Act Friday.

Indiana’s 168-page plan details how state officials will comply with the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced the No Child Left Behind law in 2015.

Movement Biomarker Could Help In Autism Diagnosis

Jan 19, 2018

A recently published study that Indiana University researchers co-authored provides the best evidence yet that movement could be used as a biomarker or a physical measurement that doctors can use to diagnosis. The findings focus on autism.

Diagnosing autism remains dependent on a subjective assessment of a person’s symptoms. IU physics professor Jorge Jose says that can be a problem.

A House committee has approved legislation to track foster children and their success in schools.

The bill would require the Indiana Department of Education and the Department of Child Services to gather data on foster care students in public schools – specifically, the graduation rates and enrollment data for those students.

Deb Brewer is the regional director of a foster care and family services group called The Villages of Indiana, and she says that data could mean more support for foster children.

Legislative leaders confirm that a push to allow grocery and convenience stores to sell cold beer is dead for the 2018 session. But those same leaders offer supporters hope for the future.

A group of Democratic women political and business leaders announced the creation Thursday of a program aimed at getting more Democratic women into positions of power throughout the state.

The initiative is called Hoosier Women Forward, a nine-month long leadership training program that will work with 20 to 25 Indiana Democratic women each year.