Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

Gun Carry Recommendations Include Hurdles To License

Oct 30, 2017

A special legislative study committee wrapped up three months of work this week. The panel declined to get specific on a recommendation to eliminate Indiana’s handgun license requirement, opting instead to make recommendations on studying current hurdles to getting a gun license.

The joint committee adopted the report after hearing hours of testimony from both sides on the issue of repealing a law requiring a license to carry handguns in public.

An Indiana Board of Education member has resigned as leader of the beleaguered Hoosier Academies charter school network amid state sanctions due to years of failing academics.

Byron Ernest led Hoosier Academies Virtual School and two other related schools in the Indianapolis-based network since 2014. He did not respond to a request for comment.

Representatives from businesses both small (multiple tech start-ups) and large (pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly) discussed how President Donald Trump’s tax reform framework would affect their companies Friday morning in Fishers.

With only Trump’s preliminary outline in front of them, they were cautiously optimistic about the impact of the administration’s reform plan.

Bacteria's 'Sense Of Touch' Discovery Made In Indiana

Oct 27, 2017

A new discovery by Indiana University researchers reveals how bacteria sense touch. The information provides new clues into how bacteria form biofilms, which can be harmful to humans and critical infrastructure.

Indiana University biology professor Yves Brun says most bacteria don’t just float around but attach to surfaces and form colonies called biofilms.

“These biofilms have a huge impact on the environment, on human health, on industry and so on,” says Brun.

Courtesy of Family and Children's Center, South Bend

 

 

The Family and Children’s Center  in South Bend is promoting the use of baby boxes in St. Joseph County in an effort to help reduce infant mortality rates. Baby boxes are cardboard boxes that come with a sleeping pad and provide a safe sleep option for newborns up to six months.
 

Holcomb Heads To India On Trade Mission

Oct 27, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb left for a week-long trade mission to India Friday. The country has deep ties to the Hoosier information technology and manufacturing sectors, and thousands of Indian students attend college here.

Holcomb will meet India-based executives for Hoosier companies like Cummins, which is also a major employer of skilled Indian workers on visas.

Public Health Study Committee Wraps Up Summer Work

Oct 26, 2017

A legislative study committee on public health issues voted Thursday to recommend the General Assembly take action on diabetes and the state’s nursing shortage as it wrapped up its work ahead of the next legislative session.

In recent years diabetes action plans have failed at the Statehouse. But this year’s study committee showed momentum.

Eskenazi pharmacist Jasmine Gonzolva, a non-legislative member of the committee, says much of the focus is on screening and prevention.

Indiana reportedly won’t be the location of a new Toyota-Mazda plant slated for construction in the U.S. in the next few years.

The South Bend Tribune reports economic development officials in St. Joseph County announced this week that Indiana had been dropped from consideration.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue stressed the importance of agricultural education and the need for more young people to get involved in agriculture policy.

“These young people are the ones I will exhort and implore to communicate and be aggressive advocates for truth,” he said.

FFA member Tess Seibel, from Virginia, agreed with Perdue. She says misconceptions around the food production process is one of the biggest challenges facing farmers today.

The first stop in our series on the Ports of Indiana was Burns Harbor, an international maritime facility in the heart of steel country. Four hours down Interstate 65, the Port of Jeffersonville is less a port and more a manufacturing hub that happens to be on the Ohio River.

For the next part of our series, Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Annie Ropeik reports Jeffersonville is pushing ahead with expansions to cement its place in the Midwest industrial corridor.

A report focused on ending the opioid crisis highlights state policies that are making an impact. Indiana has taken many of the steps mentioned and is used, in one case, as a positive example.

The report from the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse mentions a new Indiana law that allows counties to set up syringe exchange programs without state approval.

A legislative study committee focused on Indiana’s environmental issues declined to recommend any policy changes to the General Assembly Wednesday. The panel’s final hearing focused on problems related to the access and affordability of drinking water.

Despite the final report’s lack of recommendations, Sen. Ed Charbonneau (R-Valparaiso) says it does include a lot to, in his words, “mull over.”

The Indiana Civic Health Index uses data from the census and the U.S. Elections Project to measure how much Hoosiers engage with their government and their community.

For example, one of the questions from the U.S. Elections Project – do you eat dinner with a family member frequently? Nearly 93 percent of Hoosiers said yes in 2016, ranking third in the country.

Hoosiers are more likely to attend public meetings, volunteer in community organizations and interact with their neighbors than in years past.

A national nonprofit is partnering with Indiana to improve high-speed internet access for schools across Indiana during the next two years.

The focus will be on 30 schools that lack high-speed fiber connections. There will also be assistance for school districts to apply for federal grants to improve broadband infrastructure or increase classroom Wi-Fi access.

The organization EducationSuperHighway, a San Francisco-based nonprofit working to bring internet access to U.S. classrooms, will also help local schools negotiate lower rates with internet providers.

Children in Indiana’s minority and immigrant populations often have a more difficult start in life according to the conclusions of the latest look at disparity in wellbeing for Hoosier kids.

About 20 percent of Indiana’s population identifies as African-American, Hispanic, Asian or another non-white race.

Indiana Youth Institute President Tami Silverman says a new report from the Annie E. Casey foundation finds children in these households are less likely to benefit from opportunities to grow and develop.

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