Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

What Education Laws Go Into Effect July 1?

Jun 29, 2017

The majority of bills Gov. Eric Holcomb signed after this past legislative session take effect Saturday. Here’s a quick recap of which education laws will soon be official.

Pre-K Pilot Expansion

A judge’s ruling halting parts of the state’s new anti-abortion law is, in the words of retiring Indiana Planned Parenthood CEO Betty Cockrum, a “fine last hurrah” for her.

Legislation Aims To Increase Addiction Providers

Jun 29, 2017

More than half of Indiana counties don’t have mental health care options available. A new bipartisan proposal in Congress to increase the number of providers specializing in addiction treatment.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says many Hoosiers, just like many in America, are battling addiction to opioids and other dangerous substances. And he says there’s s a need for more professionals on the front lines.

Older Hoosiers Express Concerns Over Health Bill

Jun 29, 2017

Nearly 14,000 callers from around Indiana took part in a telephone town hall about the Senate health care bill with U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.). The call was organized by AARP Indiana, which strongly opposes the measure.

Their opposition to the health care reform bill stems from worries about increased costs and reduced benefits.

Donnelly says he has the same concerns.

Judge Halts Key Parts Of New Indiana Anti-Abortion Law

Jun 28, 2017

Key parts of Indiana’s new anti-abortion law won’t take effect after federal Judge Sarah Evans Barker issued a temporary injunction to prevent the state from enforcing three parts of the controversial measure, ruled the provisions unconstitutional.

More than 50 people gathered outside Republican U.S. Senator Todd Young’s Indianapolis office today for what’s known as a “die in.”  The protest centered on the Republican health care bill.

The group held painted grave markers and laid down on the side walk outside Young’s downtown office building.

Catherine Osborne drove from South Bend to be at the event. She’s worried about the future of Medicaid.

The Indiana Supreme Court will hear arguments in a legal battle playing out in Long Beach, on the shoreline of Lake Michigan. It centers on a simple question: Who owns the beach?       

Don and Bobbie Gunderson filed a complaint in April 2014 that claimed their property extended to the water’s edge, wherever that is at any given moment.

Indianapolis School Plan: Close 3 High Schools

Jun 28, 2017

A proposal to remake secondary education at Indianapolis Public Schools will leave only four high schools near the city center, out of seven county-wide, and give students the choice to attend one of more than 12 career-focused programs divided among the remaining schools.

INDIANAPOLIS — More than 100 protesters gathered outside the Indianapolis Public Schools administrative office Tuesday evening to demand district leaders slow down on a a plan to close multiple high schools next year.

The IPS administration’s recommendation on which high schools to close and how to reuse the facilities will be released Wednesday.

Eli Lilly is partnering with Pfizer to help develop a new drug that could be the first of a new class of non-opioid pain medications.

There hasn’t been a new pain medication discovery in about 50 years. The last new non-opioid pain medication to hit the market was ibuprofen in the late 1960s.

That’s a problem, because Indiana University Health’s Daniel Rusyniak says when it comes to the treatment of chronic pain we need more options.

An Indiana law banning robocalls will stand after a seven-year legal battle, after the U.S. Supreme Court decided this week not to review a lower court’s decision in the case.

The legal challenge from a group called Patriotic Veterans, Inc. started in 2010. It sought to create an exception for political messages in Indiana’s laws against robocalls. Current law allows campaigns and political groups to make live calls, even to numbers registered on the do not call list.

Uneven, wet weather is complicating the growing season for Indiana farmers.

There’s much more cash cropland this week that has too much moisture in its soil than at this time last year, according to the USDA’s latest crop progress report.

And the federal agency says the current condition of Indiana’s corn and soybeans isn’t as good as it was a year ago.

Results from the first-ever study of Indiana’s school voucher system found negative academic effects among low-income students in math, but also showed the same students could match or outperform public school peers in English – if they remained in the private school long enough.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is moving forward with a plan to demolish East Chicago’s lead-contaminated West Calumet Housing Complex.

Residents had many questions and received few answers at a tense public meeting about the environmental review of the plan Monday night.

The city of East Chicago finished relocating more than 1,000 housing complex residents this spring. Officials plan to demolish the complex’s buildings later this year.

HUD must first sign off.

An anti-abortion group is criticizing a decline in Planned Parenthood’s services and clients over the last decade. The attack comes as the number of abortions increased slightly.

The number of patients at Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is down about 50 percent since 2007. The organization went from 35 clinics to 17 in that time.

Indiana Right to Life president Mike Fichter says that’s proof the organization is failing.

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