Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

EDITOR’S NOTE, JUNE 14: This developing story has been updated. Read more here.

What’s left of the Marsh grocery chain went to auction Monday morning – but there’s no word yet on how the bidding went.

Attorneys in the Delaware law office where the auction was set to take place did not immediately return requests for comment. They represent Indiana-based Marsh in its bankruptcy proceedings.

Indiana Tax Revenues Surge Above Projections In May

Jun 12, 2017

Indiana tax collections surged above expectations in May as the state heads into the final month of the fiscal year.

A new revenue forecast delivered in April put a damper on Indiana’s tax revenue performance. The state was $34 million behind expectations after last month’s poor collections.

Indiana’s Supreme Court is back to its full five members as Gov. Eric Holcomb announces his selection of Wabash County Judge Christopher Goff to join the bench.

Holcomb says few decisions he’ll make as governor will be as impactful as his appointment of Goff. Holcomb calls the Ball State graduate a critical and forward thinker who believes in judicial restraint.

Indiana has open manufacturing and construction jobs, but not enough workers with the training to fill them.

The Indiana Institute for Working Families released a new report this month on some of the biggest challenges for people who want to go back to school to earn credentials.

Andrew Bradley is the senior policy analyst for the institute and says more than a million jobs will open in the next decade that require specific training. And most are in manufacturing and construction.

Holcomb Departs For Trade Mission In Hungary, France

Jun 11, 2017

Eric Holcomb leaves Monday for his first international economic development trip as governor. He’ll spend 10 days in Hungary and France, hoping to shore up global ties for Indiana’s top-earning manufacturing and automotive industries.

Indiana is already a center of investment for countries that include Japan and Germany. But the Indiana Economic Development Corporation says the Hoosier State will be the first to create what it calls a “formal framework with Hungary” to promote business and trade development.

Gov. Eric Holcomb filled two vacant spots on the State Board of Education, appointing Kathleen Mote and previous board member Tony Walker.

Mote is from Madison and is the current intermin chancellor for Ivy Tech Community College’s Columbus/Southeast Region. She replaces Lee Ann Kwiatkowski, who resigned her position to work as state superintendent Jennifer McCormick’s chief of staff.

An Indiana logistics council wants to better connect military veterans with advanced manufacturing jobs.

Conexus Indiana will partner with five big Indiana firms to run a new vet-focused jobs site that could eventually expand to other industries.

Subaru of Indiana Automotive, in Lafayette, is among those working with Conexus on the program, called INVets. Human resources manager Brad Rohrer says Subaru recruited veterans at Kentucky’s Fort Campbell during its last big hiring push.

Thousands of older Hoosiers end up in the intensive care unit (ICU) each year and a majority of them suffer from delirium.

Delirium is a severe brain failure and those who suffer from it are at higher risk for dementia. ICU stays put older people at risk of delirium.

Researchers are developing and testing the state’s first program to provide after care to these patients via telemedicine.

Indiana’s state-run local food label hopes a new influx of cash from the legislature will help to court more businesses that sell local products.

It’s the first direct state funding the Indiana Grown program has received.

The state Department of Agriculture scraped the program together from existing funding the last two years, says commissioner Ted McKinney.

They recruited 800 members, he says. Nearly all of them are local producers.

The 44 remaining Marsh stores will go to auction Monday, June 12, as the Indiana company’s bankruptcy process continues.

The Fishers-based grocery chain received multiple bids for its assets as of Wednesday’s deadline, triggering the auction.

The winning buyer may choose to keep some Marsh stores open, convert them to another chain’s brand, or close the stores entirely.

 

There are two school districts in Wabash, Indiana, not enough students to fill both, and both are struggling financially.

Jason Callahan is superintendent of one of these districts, Wabash City Schools, and he’s made a lot of changes to save money.

“At some point you can’t cut any more,” Callahan says. “We’re down to one elementary, one middle school one high school, in our whole district, so there’s no more buildings to reorganize.”

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce’s latest report card on the state economy’s race to the top shows some progress. But a lot of obstacles remain.

The Vision 2025 Plan is basically the Chamber’s policy platform. Chamber president Kevin Brinegar says it lays out the ways Indiana’s economy should succeed.

“We believe, if we can be best of class in each of these areas, that Indiana will have the best chance for competitiveness and prosperity in the 21st-century global economy,” he says.

State Announces Pre-K Expansion Counties

Jun 7, 2017

Low-income families in 15 counties will soon be able to use state money to send their 4-year-old children to preschool. Indiana’s first pre-K pilot included five counties – some urban and some rural.

One of the additional counties is Delaware, where Carrie Bale runs the By5 Early Childhood Initiative. She says while she’s glad for the new opportunity, the expansion includes a new requirement that could exclude families that need the service.

The Indiana State Board of Education approved four private schools with a history of low performance and academic failure to accept publicly funded vouchers to cover tuition for incoming students during a meeting Wednesday.

The schools had lost their ability to enroll new students in the Choice Scholarship Program because they had been rated a D or F on the state’s accountability system for at least two consecutive years.

Indiana may not join the next wave of states that legalize medical or recreational marijuana, but it doesn’t mean Hoosiers can’t partake in the booming business.

That was the message from national Marijuana Business Association founder Dave Rheins at a forum in Indianapolis Tuesday night.

In a cigar smoke-filled room at a downtown social club, he told a small crowd other states’ up-start marijuana sectors need lawyers, marketers, investors and agritech experts to get involved.

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