Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

When you drive over a pothole in your neighborhood, you can report it to the city and hope they come fix it soon – or you can fix it yourself. At least, that’s what one Indianapolis man has been doing this year.

Michael Warren’s project, which he calls Open Source roads, reveals a lot about the different ways residents and governments try to care for their communities.

An Indiana hate crimes law may become reality next year after House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) endorsed the idea in the wake of white supremacist violence in Virginia last weekend.

Gov. Eric Holcomb called the events in Charlottesville – in which a woman was killed when a car allegedly driven by a white supremacist protester plowed into a crowd of counter protesters – “sickening.”

Indiana says it wants to help train train more Hoosier workers for in-demand jobs. Two grant programs will help cover tuition for career certificates and training costs for employers in what the state calls “high-demand” areas.

The legislature approved $10 million apiece over two years for the two programs – the Workforce Ready Grant and the Employer Training Grant.

Study: Food Outlet Proximity Not Related To Obesity

Aug 14, 2017

Researchers say a new study on whether a person’s proximity to certain food options causes obesity sets itself apart from past projects.

The findings indicate policies to reduce the number of fast food places or even open more markets will not likely reduce obesity. Indiana University environmental affairs professor Coady Wing was part of a team of researchers involved in a recent study.

Vice President Mike Pence returned home to Indiana for a reveal of his official gubernatorial portrait.

Pence leans against his desk with his hands crossed in his portrait, an open Bible to his right with a photo of his wife and children, and on his left a stack of law books, and the United States and Indiana flags behind him.

Each portion of the portrait has significance to Pence, including a stack of law books that belonged to his father, that now are with him in Washington, D.C.

The University of Notre Dame will hold a walk of more than 300 miles this year to replicate the pilgrimage the school’s founders undertook in 1842. The university’s 175th anniversary celebration set to kick off Sunday, August 13.

The trek begins in Vincennes and ends in South Bend two weeks later. This is the first time the University has recreated the event.

Katherine Lane is the Senior Director of the Notre Dame Trail. She says the walk is a reminder of the original mission of the University and its founder, Rev. Edward Sorin.

Senate candidate U.S. Rep. Luke Messer (R-Shelbyville) says he thinks the rhetoric in the GOP primary will calm down as his campaign officially begins.

The tone of the race to challenge incumbent U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) has been marked by vitriol between Messer and U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg).

An Indianapolis charter school will be one of the first in the country to use a virtual reality program to teach science to high school students.

Hope Academy, on the city’s far northeast side, is purchasing the software and curriculum from a tech-startup to supplement its traditional classroom teaching.

Indiana is set to have unexpectedly big corn and soybean harvests this fall. That means continued tight profit margins for farmers and more low food prices for consumers.

Purdue University agronomists made their annual announcement of the state’s crop production forecast at the State Fair Thursday.

They say yields should better than expected, after weeks of wet, patchy weather. But economist Chris Hurt says that extra supply for the same demand will mean bad prices for Hoosier farmers.

Hoosier Family Helps Push 'Right To Try' Nationally

Aug 10, 2017

A “Right To Try” bill that allows families to use prescription drugs that don’t have full FDA approval passed the U.S. Senate last week with unanimous support. U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) helped author the legislation, modeled after an Indiana state law, with encouragement from a Hoosier mother and her son.

Jordan McLinn, 8, became the face of Indiana’s “Right To Try” bill in 2015. Last year his mother, Laura McLinn, visited Donnelly to lobby for a federal version.

Indiana 2018 Fiscal Year Off To Slow Start

Aug 10, 2017

Indiana’s 2018 fiscal year began not with a bang, but a whimper, as all of its tax revenues came in below expectations.

The last fiscal year – which ended in June – finished with total state tax collections just barely ahead of projections. Sales and corporate taxes slightly exceeded expectations but individual income taxes failed to hit their target.

And, no, we’re not talking about Sonic the Hedgehog.

An exhibit at the Indiana State Fair allows visitors to hear how the Hoosier State has changed over the last two centuries, thanks, in part, to a new branch of science —soundscape ecology.

“We use sounds to tell us about landscapes and the animals that reside there and how places change over time,” says Ben Gottesman, an ecologist at Purdue University.

Man Accused Of Killing Southport Officer In Court

Aug 9, 2017

The man accused of killing a Southport police officer had his first court hearing Wednesday. Jason Brown’s court date was twice delayed because of injuries he sustained in a car crash where Officer Aaron Allan tried to rescue him.

According to an affidavit, Brown shot Aaron Allan 11 times while hanging upside down in an overturned car. Another officer responding to the July 27 accident shot Brown.

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill wants to replicate the work of an Indianapolis anti-violence program in other communities around the state. Hill plans to set aside money from his office to spread the Ten Point Coalition model.

The Indianapolis Ten Point Coalition is a community-run anti-violence program. In partnership with the Indianapolis police, the coalition uses a boots on the ground approach to target high crime neighborhoods.

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) says he’ll join fellow Republicans in Congress to make tax reform his priority this fall.

Young addressed the benefits of potential cuts Tuesday after an appearance with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue at the Indiana State Fair.

“Tax reform is probably the best bang we can get for our policy buck,” Young says.

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