Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

Indiana stands to lose out if Congress approves proposed budget cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency, says environmentalists, scientists, EPA staffers, and Indiana residents.

The cuts could affect drinking water infrastructure, burden the state’s environmental regulatory agency, and hinder efforts to clean up industrial toxic waste sites.

Healthcare Partnership Aims To Help Children With Autism

Aug 3, 2017

Finding the right doctor or medical services for children can be hard. Finding those same services for children with autism can be even more difficult.

“In the autism world there can be long waits for services, there tend to be limited resources and difficulty accessing services that are needed,” says Tracy Gale, director of autism and behavior services at Easterseals Crossroads, the largest disability services organization in Indianapolis. “It can be very overwhelming for families.”

The Indiana State Fair, starting Friday, provides a nearly month-long showcase for Hoosier agriculture. As that industry has changed, its role at the fair has stayed much the same.

Every year, Hoosiers get to try Indiana-grown wares of all kinds at the State Fair. They get to see 4-H participants show off their small flocks and exhibition animals.

What’s interesting, says Indiana State Poultry Association executive vice president Paul Brennan, is that it’s all evolved and modernized far less than the state’s major agriculture sectors themselves.

In an effort to respond to patients’ desires for speed and convenience, health networks are thinking small.

Microhospitals — which typically offer limited procedures and acute care services in a building with a significantly smaller footprint than traditional hospitals — have proven popular in other states, and a handful of the facilities are planned to open in Indiana.

Planned Parenthood in Merrillville is able to provide abortions again after halting those services for a couple weeks.

Charter Schools USA could relinquish control of three Indianapolis schools in 2020 if the State Board of Education approves a proposal next week. Updated contracts between the Florida-based company and the state would require a transition of the schools back to control of Indianapolis Public Schools in three years.

The Indiana Recycling Coalition received a $50,000 grant that will go towards its Commercial Food Composting Program to help reduce food waste.

The U.S. spends more than $200 billion a year to make food that is never eaten. One in 7 Americans are food insecure, despite the 52 million tons of food sent to a landfill each year, according to the group ReFED.

Carey Hamilton, executive director of the Indiana Recycling Coalition, says when food waste can’t be reduced where it’s produced, composting can have many benefits, including “creating a rich soil product.”

Indiana lags far behind other states in providing families access to state-funded pre-K programs, according to a new study of Indiana’s pre-K offerings. The analysis finds Indiana, the only state that ties a family’s pre-K eligibility to work and education requirements, limits participation for children who may be most in need.

A majority of former football players suffer from a degenerative brain condition. That’s according to a new study in the Journal of American Medicine. The condition is linked to concussions, but Indiana experts say it shouldn’t be cause for concern for all players.

Indiana University Health psychiatrist and neuroscience expert Thomas McAllister says the condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE is a type of dementia.

“And it’s been linked to people with certain head injuries,” says McAllister

Half a dozen homeowners in rural Bartholomew County will get to pay less in property taxes because they live near concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.

The decision comes about a year after the families in the town of Hope appealed to the county about the impact of large hog farms on their home values.

After the county denied their requests in March, the neighbors appealed the case to the State Board of Tax Review.

Welcome To The Summer Camp For Kids Impacted By HIV

Jul 28, 2017


The Tataya Mato week at Indianapolis’ Jameson Camp is a free sleepaway camp for children impacted by HIV/AIDS. (Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting)

It’s a sleep away camp. It’s free. And once a summer the Jameson Camp in Indianapolis hosts a session for campers with this in common: Either they or a family member have HIV/AIDS.

The goal? Use summer camp to help children process their struggles with the disease.

Just because water is legal, doesn’t mean it’s safe. That’s the conclusion from a new report by the Environmental Working Group, a national environmental advocacy organization.

Governments set limits on how much pollution can be in drinking water. But Sonya Lunder, a senior analyst with EWG who worked on the report, says those limits are determined by what’s feasible and affordable for drinking water utilities.

“And there’s a huge gap between what’s legal in drinking water and what might be safe,” Lunder says.

A new federal-city partnership aims to reduce violence in Indianapolis by connecting police and federal prosecutors.

The National Public Safety Partnership allows cities to consult the U.S. Department of Justice for training and to connect with resources. Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett says this will strengthen the city’s current efforts.

“What we’re doing is reminding ourselves of what we’ve been doing for years and that is to continue to stem the rising tide of violence so many urban areas across the country are experiencing,” Hogsett says.

Whooping Cough Cases On The Rise In Indiana

Jul 27, 2017

Twice the number of whooping cough cases have been recorded compared to this time last year and the Indiana State Department of Health is investigating. Outbreak supervisor Shawn Richards says

“One, is what we’re seeing normal?” says Richards. “Two, are there epidemiological links to other schools or states?”

For the first half of the year, 136 cases of pertussis or whooping cough have been reported compared to 66 in 2016.

The state says the increase could be due to more cases being reported or a waning vaccine. Richards says it could also be something else.

A national fair housing group says Deutsche Bank and two other businesses are less likely to maintain foreclosed, bank-owned homes in majority-black areas of 30 cities, including Indianapolis and Gary.

A new version of a federal complaint, out this week, expands the investigation.

The National Fair Housing Alliance and 19 local organizations first filed a complaint with the Department of Housing and Urban Development against Deutsche Bank in 2014.

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