Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

U.S. education secretary Betsy DeVos weathered a volley of questions this week about a Bloomington, Indiana, private school that receives state-funded vouchers but reserves the right to deny admission or discontinue enrollment to students from lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender families.

During her research on youth behavioral health, University of Indianapolis assistant professor Katherine Kivisto was struck by a connection she was seeing.

“What I was seeing was kids that had a really hard time with self-regulating their emotions and tolerating especially distressing feelings they would turn to substances as a way of coping,” Kivisto says.

The University of Indianapolis’s first study to be funded by the National Institute of Health will work to understand how emotion regulation is connected to teen addiction.

A Purdue University professor is getting nearly half a million dollars from the USDA to study how food policies creating new labels and certifications can affect prices and consumer choice.

The research received $483,000 from the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture this month. It seeks to answer questions about things like GMO label requirements.

On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP health care bill – the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next 10 years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That’s one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March.

 

The four minute audio story is a tour of the Kankakee Sands by land manager, Ted Anchor, as he walks reporter Nick Janzen through the conservation efforts in Indiana. 

The last bison in Indiana was killed in the 1830s in French Lick. But in October 2016, the Nature Conservancy released 23 from a herd in South Dakota onto Kankakee Sands. Many of those cows are currently having calves – nine have been born so far.

Change could be coming for Indiana’s alcohol laws after legislative leaders announced a two-year study of the state’s alcohol statutes. And legislators say the special commission won’t involve the alcohol industry.

Controversy this past session over convenience stores obtaining alcohol carryout permits – otherwise expressly prohibited in state law – prompted the creation of the alcohol law study commission.

One day, your internet use may not be limited by 4G speeds. As early as 2018, many in the United States will be able to use 5G enabled devices.

Just a few blocks away from the roar of the Speedway, there’s a tiny gray house.

Unlike its neighbors, it’s not receiving an internet connection from wires running inside. Its internet comes from a 5G radio.

This is one of Verizon’s prototypes – the only one in Indiana. The company is partnering with Ericcson and Intel to demonstrate 5G wireless internet.

Scientists are predicting a dangerous tick season this year, and Hoosier health professionals are keeping their eyes on the little vectors.

Researchers like Indiana University biology professor Keith Clay says Indiana’s warmer winter means more ticks survive from summer to spring.

“It’s also conducive to the animal population they depend on for blood meals, mice, chipmunks other small rodents,” says Clay.

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) released its 2016 State Preschool Yearbook Wednesday, which shows Indiana’s early childhood education efforts don’t match those of other states, but recent legislation shows improvements in how the state funds preschool.

Indy 500 Organ Donor Campaign Helps Grieving Families

May 24, 2017

Organ donation has become a mission for racing family’s during this year’s Indianapolis 500 with a goal of increasing the number of registered donors – and through the process comes healing and hope.

A Little Sister

Taylor McLean was close to her brother Bryan Clauson. He was an organ donor.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited a high-performing private Indianapolis high school Tuesday, where nearly every student receives a voucher. She toured Providence Cristo Rey High School on a fact-finding mission and meet students and staff.

DeVos’ school visit follows a Monday speech in Indianapolis where she alluded to “an ambitious” federal expansion of school choice. DeVos did not lay out details of what a federal program could look like.

As Indiana farmers hurry through planting season – the corn crop is nearly three-quarters planted as of Monday, with soybeans nearly half done – they’re also watching big changes at the USDA.

The department is reorganizing its trade and rural development programs, while the White House takes aim at those issues in its own way.

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos praised Indiana’s expansive school choice laws in Indianapolis Monday and alluded to a federal effort to expand school choice at the conference.

DeVos gave the keynote address at the annual conference for the American Federation for Children, a school choice advocacy group.

Six months after President Donald Trump intervened in Carrier’s planned Indianapolis layoffs, the company is releasing the final number of jobs it still plans to cut.

The Department of Workforce Development got the appliance-maker’s official notification of the layoffs Monday, in a letter dated May 19.

It says 632 workers will lose their jobs at Carrier’s Indianapolis fan coil factory between late July and the end of the year.

More than 700 Indiana students received a certificate of multilingual proficiency from the state, meaning the students are proficient in two languages.

The Department of Education awarded this certificate, and this is the first cohort of students receiving the recognition.

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