Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

When It Comes To Our Politics, Family Matters

Sep 27, 2017

It can happen anywhere: that moment when you gaze at the people around you and realize you simply can't understand their politics.

How can these people – be they our friends, colleagues or, worst of all, our spouses – believe as they do, when facts and reason clearly point in the opposite direction? How can they support political candidates whose views are so antithetical to our definition of common sense?

They're questions voters across the country have been asking a lot this election season – voters like Kate Burkett of Indiana and Tom Barnes of Maryland.

Hoosiers interested in and working with food systems across Indiana attended the second annual Indiana Food Summit in Indianapolis this week, where healthy food access continues to be a popular topic.

When trying to incentivize smaller retail stores to sell healthy food and produce you first have to make sure that’s what people want says Kara Lubischer, with University of Missouri Extension.

“We focus on the demand side first,” says Lubischer. “So we build up community support for the local retailer before we do anything inside the store.”

Indiana’s judicial system is on track to achieve statewide electronic filing in all courts by early 2019 at the latest.

The state’s Supreme Court justices outlined the latest information from the court’s annual report Tuesday.

Seventy percent of all new cases statewide in the last year were filed through Odyssey, Indiana’s primary court data system. That’s up from 65 percent the year before.

Applications Open For Half-Year In 10 Pre-K Expansion Counties

Sep 26, 2017

The state-funded preschool pilot program that began with five counties was expanded during the 2017 legislative session for 15 more counties. Now, parents in 10 of those counties can apply for half-year preschool.

But all low-income families applying will also have to comply with a new program requirement.

A state grant would pay for half or full day preschool for a 4-year-old child beginning next January.

Fewer than half of Indiana’s public school districts are participating in a free lead testing program, according to Jim McGoff, environmental programs director at the Indiana Finance Authority.

The IFA created the voluntary program after lead contamination in places such as Flint, Michigan, and East Chicago, Indiana, rose to national prominence.

Jim McGoff told a legislative study committee he has confidence the water supply itself is lead-free because of tests water utilities are required to perform.

New Tool Calculates Cost Of Sleep Disorders

Sep 25, 2017

A new research tool calculates the cost of fatigue for workers. According to the National Safety Council or NSC, untreated sleep disorders play into millions in lost productivity and health care costs.

A new online calculator measures how lack of sleep and work are linked says NSC President and CEO Deborah Hersman.

“An employee with insomnia incurs at least $2,250 in excess health care cost each year and 11 lost days in productivity,” says Hersman.

A federal judge permanently struck down key portions of Indiana’s controversial 2016 anti-abortion bill.

It was tense even before they started. Reporters tweeted that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump entered the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner from separate sides of the room, and didn't even shake hands (which at this point really isn't a surprise).

But there was hope that Thursday night's event could serve as a comedic salve for the nation following three decidedly nasty presidential debates. The fundraising event for Catholic charities — now in its 71st year — traditionally is a time for the candidates to offer jokes about themselves and their opponent.

Pence Offers Few Details On Tax Reform During Visit To Anderson

Sep 22, 2017

Vice President Mike Pence returned to Indiana Friday to call for federal tax reform. And, as expected, Pence asked all of Indiana’s Congressional delegation – including Democrat, Sen. Joe Donnelly – to support the efforts.

Pence gave no details about specific ways to reform the federal tax code at an appearance in Anderson. He says taxes would be lower for working families, small businesses and family farms – a line Hoosiers will remember from his term as governor. Pence says President Donald Trump will sign a tax cut by the end of the year, with one goal in mind.

Indiana has agreed to buy Ohio River-front land in Lawrenceburg that could house the state’s fourth port.

The state has been considering using the 725 acres in southeast Indiana as its next port facility for nearly a year.

Now, it’s inked an agreement to purchase the site, pending further study. Gov. Eric Holcomb’s office says the agreement will let port officials “begin studies to examine the economic and environmental viability of the parcel.”

Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Loretta Rush will co-chair a national task force to examine how the country’s opioid epidemic impacts the justice system.

Rush has been outspoken about the increase of Hoosier children into the court system because of opioids. Rush says much attention has been placed on the health aspect of the crisis – but she argues there needs to be more focus on how courts can deal with the influx of cases.

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill announced Friday he will launch an investigation into the recent data breach at credit reporting agency Equifax.

The personal information of nearly 4 million Hoosiers was potentially exposed by the Equifax breach.

Steelworkers from around the country were in D.C. this week to ask Congress to strengthen its support for the domestic steel industry.

Among them was Billy McCall, who’s worked at U.S. Steel’s huge Gary Works mill for more than 20 years.

He and other United Steelworkers union members talked with federal representatives this week about an ongoing trade investigation into the effect of excess Chinese steel imports on national security.

McCall says that’s about not just defense, but infrastructure and people.

Hoosiers Outspoken On Confined Animal Farms

Sep 22, 2017

A legislative study committee took nearly six hours of public testimony and heard a slew of policy recommendation Tuesday on confined animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.

About 100 people showed up to provide comments as the committee considers CAFO and animal agriculture regulations in Indiana.

Malcom DeKryger, CEO of Belstra Milling, which provides animal feed to Hoosier farms, told a story about two brothers in Pulaski County who wanted to expand their family’s operations, but were denied a CAFO because of restrictive zoning ordinances.

Indiana’s business community is waiting to see how federal tax reform plans, set for release next week, might impact their companies and workers.

At a roundtable in Indianapolis on Thursday, business leaders said they want to communicate to their workers and the public that lowering America’s corporate tax rate will be good for more than just executive paychecks.

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