U.S.

Around the Nation
3:58 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

Wildlife Activists Try To Save Staten Island's Wild Turkeys

A group of wild turkeys surrounds Joanna Tierno on Mason Avenue in Staten Island. She loves to see the birds roaming the streets of her neighborhood.
Courtesy of David Karopkin

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 4:23 pm

By one estimate, Americans will eat 46 million turkeys on Thanksgiving.

But this story is not about them. It's about a smaller group of turkeys — about 100 who roam the wild streets of New York City. These feral birds live in Staten Island, the least urban of the five boroughs. Local officials have been trying to relocate the birds for years, but their plan has had trouble getting off the ground.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Wacky Wrestlers Of Yesteryear

Two men wrestle in a ring full of smelt during the Smelt Carnival in Marinette, Wis., in 1939.
Wisconsin Historical Society

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:05 pm

Hoodslam — a popular spectacle that is staged monthly in Oakland, Calif. — is described by the San Francisco Chronicle as "part wrestling show, part carnival act and all comedy."

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Thu November 27, 2014

A Nationwide Outpouring Of Support For Tiny Ferguson Library

The Ferguson Public Library.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 4:23 pm

The Ferguson Public Library is just a block away from the center of demonstrations at the Ferguson Police Department. As we've reported, when violent protests this week led to the burning of more than a dozen businesses and the uncertainty caused schools to close, the library stayed open.

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Holiday Travel Snarls Look To Be Easing

Morgan Griffin, 20 (left), and his brother, Eric Crandell, 12, browse their mobile devices as they wait to board the Amtrak Pacific Surfliner train bound for Santa Barbara, Calif., at Union Station in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Snow and rain in the East snarled holiday travel, but by Thanksgiving Day, things looked to be improving.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 11:00 am

The weather is still wreaking havoc for Americans still traveling today in planes, trains and automobiles, but for the most part, the situation has improved dramatically as people crisscross the country making their way to Thanksgiving gatherings with family and friends.

AAA estimates that 46 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles to attend Thanksgiving festivities — the most in seven years.

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Shots - Health News
9:03 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Your Adult Siblings May Be The Secret To A Long, Happy Life

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 10:19 am

Somehow we're squeezing 16 people into our apartment for Thanksgiving this year, with relatives ranging in age from my 30-year-old nephew to my 90-year-old mother. I love them all, but in a way the one I know best is the middle-aged man across the table whose blue eyes look just like mine: my younger brother Paul.

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Around the Nation
4:44 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Damaged Businesses Vow Ferguson Will Rebound From Violence

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Code Switch
3:51 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Stories Of Your First Thanksgiving In The U.S.

We don't endorse using a trident to carve your turkey.
floodllama Flickr

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:12 pm

This past week, we called for stories about your first Thanksgiving in the United States. Who'd you spend it with? Where were you coming from? What'd you eat? What'd you think of it? we wondered.

And many of the stories we heard from you were about food: You had issues roasting the turkey properly. Your mom found, um, a creative solution to making your bird golden-brown. You ate a lot of different alternative Thanksgiving meals. Your stories were goofy and weird, but most of them made us smile. Here are some of them:

Leticia Ortiz

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Shots - Health News
3:49 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Millennial Doctors May Be More Tech-Savvy, But Is That Better?

Medical residents including Dr. Amy Ho (bottom right) helped with first aid at the Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago.
Courtesy Amy Ho

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:12 pm

The University of Texas Southwestern class of 2014 is celebrating graduation. Class vice president Amy Ho has shed her scrubs for heels and a black dress. She says with modern technology, med school really wasn't too hard.

"If you want to do the whole thing by video stream, you can," she says. "I would wake up at 10 a.m., work out for an hour or so, get some lunch and then video stream for 6 hours and then go to happy hour. It actually was not that bad."

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The Two-Way
1:00 am
Thu November 27, 2014

In Ferguson And Across The Country, Protests Are More Subdued

Snow falls Wednesday night as Missouri National Guard members stand outside of the Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:18 pm

Protests of Mondays grand jury decision were dampened somewhat on Wednesday night — particularly in Ferguson, Mo., where only a few dozen protesters braved the snow to demonstrate.

NPR's Elise Hu says things were fairly subdued there.

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Business
6:01 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Jacksonville Split Over Joining A Southern Port Dredging Frenzy

Vince Cameron has worked the docks at the Port of Jacksonville for more than three decades. If the city doesn't deepen the port, he says, a new breed of massive cargo ship will instead go to Savannah, Ga., or Charleston, S.C.
Peter Haden WJCT News

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 8:01 pm

Vince Cameron knows all the people buzzing around the Port of Jacksonville in their bright blaze vests. "My dad was a longshoreman for 44 years on these docks before he retired," he says. "I'm a child of this port."

In his hard hat and with a whistle around his neck, Cameron looks on as a weathered Horizon Lines freighter pulls in from Puerto Rico.

The ship is "a baby in the whole scheme of things," says Cameron, president of the local longshoreman's union. "It's a good ship ... but she's kinda slow and she uses diesel fuel. I mean, she drinks it like water."

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