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WVPE & the IUSB Sustainability Studies Program Presents

The IUSB Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series

January – April, 2018

Deb DeFreeuw, Force 5 Creative Director, and Brenda Torres, Crowe Horwath LLP, speak Wednesday night, February 21 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “Sustainability as Brand: The Business Case,” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Shaun Maeyens, founder of Zen Café, and Becky Reimbold, Proprietor of Just Goods Genearl Store, speak Wednesday night, February 28 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “Conserving Consumption: Sustainable Business Models That Work” will be moderated by Harry Vasilopoulos of IUSB’s Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics.  The event begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Kris Krouse, Executive Director of the Shirley Heinze Land Trust, speaks Wednesday night, March 7, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. His talk, “In Bog We Trust: Protecting Natural Assets,” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Marty Mecktenberg, Founder of Empower Designs, speaks Wednesday night, March 21, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. His talk, “The Successes and Failures of Global Sustainability,” begins at 7 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Sam Centellas, Director of La Casa de Amistad, and Santi Garces, Chief Innovation Officer for the City of South Bend, IN, speak Wednesday night, March 28 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “Recreating Cities for Sustainable Living,” is moderated by  Mike Keen, Founder of Thrive Michiana. The event begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Kaitlin Harris, the Urban Adaptation Assessment Project Manager with Notre Dame’s  Global Adaptation Initiative, speaks Wednesday night, April 4, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Her talk, “Igniting Conversation Today for a More Sustainable and Inclusive Tomorrow,” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

In Arkansas, there is a kind of David vs. Goliath battle underway over a weedkiller.

On one side, there is the giant Monsanto Company. On the other, a committee of 18 people, mostly farmers and small-business owners, that regulates the use of pesticides in the state. It has banned Monsanto's latest way of killing weeds during the growing season.

Terry Fuller is on that committee. He never intended to pick a fight with a billion-dollar company. "I didn't feel like I was leading the charge," he says. "I felt like I was just trying to do my duty."

California has a giant rodent problem.

To clarify, it's not that California has a huge problem with run-of-the-mill rats, it's that the state has an emerging problem with jumbo-sized critters.

Nutria, otherwise called Myocastor coypus, were thought to have been eradicated from the state's wetlands and rivers as far back as 1965, but they have mysteriously reappeared in three counties over the past year, California Department of Fish and Wildlife spokesman Peter Tira told NPR.

Hot summers can devastate canola farmers. Prolonged heat waves can leave behind fields of fallen, shattered oilseed pods and destroy vast amounts of the crop. Why canola (oilseed rape) seedpods disintegrate rapidly in prolonged heat blasts has been something of a mystery, but a new study suggests rising temperatures trigger a genetic cascade in the plant that leads to premature fruit development.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In one week, outdoor enthusiasts converged on two very different trade shows in two cities. The Outdoor Retailer and Snow Show in Denver, Colo., and the Great American Outdoor Show in Harrisburg, Pa., offered a portrait of a complex and divided American conservation movement.

The divisions began with the overtly political. The Outdoor Retailer show changed locations this year over a bitter dispute about public lands policy.

More than a dozen states oppose the Trump administration's proposal to open up nearly the entire U.S. coastline to offshore oil leasing. Federal officials will get public feedback on the plan in Sacramento on Thursday. The Interior Department says it takes local concerns into account — as happened in a recent controversial move with Florida — but states have no direct say, since the leasing would take place in federally controlled waters.

Our blog often features stories about efforts to improve life for this planet's 7 billion inhabitants: how to make sure everyone has access to clean water and power, medical care to stay healthy, enough income to feed their kids, education for the children so they can fulfill their potential.

On the 40th floor of a new Denver skyscraper, overseeing workers in hard hats and orange vests, construction manager Michael Bjes touts some of the measures that will make this building energy efficient: Energy Star appliances, LED lights, "water efficient toilet fixtures throughout the entire building."

As you clutch a cuppa for a bit of winter warmth, spare a moment to consider the elaborate process that goes into producing that seemingly simple sip of tea.

In the biggest tea-growing region in India, the hazards alone range from red spider mites to herds of wild elephants.

Grower Tenzing Bodosa, a native of Assam, fights the former and unusually invites the latter.

From the large Bodo tribe and widely known by his first name, Tenzing stands beside the vermilion flames of a brick oven that provides the heat for a drying contraption erected in his backyard.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Cape Town Copes With Water Crisis

Feb 4, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Three and a half hours east of Los Angeles lies the Salton Sea, a manmade oasis in the heart of the Mojave Desert. It was created in 1905, when a canal broke and the Colorado River flooded the desert for more than a year. The Sea became a tourist hotspot in the 1950's, perfect for swimming, boating, and kayaking. But now, people are coming here looking for something else.

Tony Largier grows apples, plums and nectarines at Little Oaks Farm, near Villiersdorp, in South Africa's Western Cape province. It's a beautiful piece of land in a valley between mountains. The closest peak gets snow in the winter.

We walk amid his nectarine trees.

"This variety is summer bright. It's sweet, crunchy. It's a good nectarine. It's one of the newer varieties," says Largier.

He and other farmers in the area pull water from the nearby Elandskloof Dam — part of a network of dams that farmers, villages and the City of Cape Town share.

Health care in the U.S. Virgin Islands remains in a critical state, five months after Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria pummeled the region.

The only hospital on St. Thomas, the Schneider Regional Medical Center, serves some 55,000 residents between the islands of St. Thomas and St. John. Schneider's facilities suffered major structural damage, forcing a decrease in its range of services, mass transfers of its patients, staff departures and significant losses in revenue. Only about one-third of the beds are currently available for patient care.

Updated 8:38 a.m. ET

A White House official confirms with NPR that Kathleen Hartnett White's controversial nomination to head the Council on Environmental Quality is being withdrawn.

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