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WVPE & the IUSB Sustainability Studies Program Presents

The IUSB Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series

January – April, 2018

Monday night, January 22, meet best selling author James Rebanks at IU South Bend. Rebanks is the 2018 Wolfson Scholar and launches the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series on campus. Moderated by Ken Smith, Ph.D., IU South Bend, topics will include his reflections on keeping shepherding traditions alive in a moment when, perhaps paradoxically, he maintains public interest in those traditions through his adept use of social media (via his Twitter account, @HerdyShepherd1). A Conversation with Author James Rebanks:  A Shepherd's Perspective Stewardship and Ethics begins at 7:00 pm in the Louise E. Addicott and Yatish J. Joshi Performance Hall.

Greg Frushour, President of Mil-tek Indiana Recycling & Waste Solutions, speak Wednesday night, January 31, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. His talk, “Why Don't Hoosiers Recycle More?” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Marco Mariani, Executive Director, South Bend Heritage Foundation, Inc. and Bill Lamie, Architect and Principal at ALLIANCE Architects speak Wednesday night, February 7 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “In Place, On Purpose” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Daragh Deegan, Aquatic Biologist, Elkhart-South Bend Aquatic Community Monitoring Program, Matt Meersman, Director, St. Joseph River Basin Commission, and Jonathan Randall Grant, Artist-in-Residence, American Church in Paris speak Wednesday night, February 14 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “For the Love of Rivers” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Deb DeFreeuw, Force 5 Creative Director, and Brenda Torres, Crowe Horwath LLP, speak Wednesday night, February 21 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “Sustainability as Brand: The Business Case,” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Shaun Maeyens, founder of Zen Café, and Becky Reimbold, Proprietor of Just Goods Genearl Store, speak Wednesday night, February 28 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “Conserving Consumption: Sustainable Business Models That Work” will be moderated by Harry Vasilopoulos of IUSB’s Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics.  The event begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Kris Krouse, Executive Director of the Shirley Heinze Land Trust, speaks Wednesday night, March 7, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. His talk, “In Bog We Trust: Protecting Natural Assets,” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Marty Mecktenberg, Founder of Empower Designs, speaks Wednesday night, March 21, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. His talk, “The Successes and Failures of Global Sustainability,” begins at 7 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Sam Centellas, Director of La Casa de Amistad, and Santi Garces, Chief Innovation Officer for the City of South Bend, IN, speak Wednesday night, March 28 as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Their talk, “Recreating Cities for Sustainable Living,” is moderated by  Mike Keen, Founder of Thrive Michiana. The event begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

Kaitlin Harris, the Urban Adaptation Assessment Project Manager with Notre Dame’s  Global Adaptation Initiative, speaks Wednesday night, April 4, as part of the Sustainability and Innovation Lecture Series at IU South Bend. Her talk, “Igniting Conversation Today for a More Sustainable and Inclusive Tomorrow,” begins at 7:00 pm in Wiekamp Hall room 1001 on the IUSB campus.

The coal industry made its presence known in Pittsburgh this week for public hearings on President Obama's controversial plan to address climate change. A key element is rules the Environmental Protection Agency proposed in June. They would cut greenhouse gas emissions — chiefly carbon dioxide — from existing power plants. The national goal is 30 percent by 2030, based on 2005 levels.

Let me guess how you feel about your urine: Get that smelly stuff away from me as fast as possible?

A small group of environmentalists in Vermont isn't as squeamish. Instead of flushing their pee down the drain, they're collecting it with special toilets that separate No. 1 and No. 2.

Then they're pooling the urine of the 170 volunteers in the pilot project (a quart or so, per person, daily) and eventually giving it to a farmer, who's putting it on her hay fields in place of synthetic fertilizer. The goal is to collect 6,000 gallons this year.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Another battle is brewing over water in the West that could put farmers against city and suburb dwellers.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

For the average school kid, weighty, wonky topics like conservation, climate change and the circular economy might sound off-putting, if not downright dull. Yet Christiane Dorion has sold millions of children's books about these very concepts.

The trick? She never mentions them. "You can teach anything to children if you pitch it at the right level and use the right words," said the U.K.-based author.

In a windowless laboratory in downtown Baltimore, some tiny, translucent fish larvae are swimming about in glass-walled tanks.

They are infant bluefin tuna. Scientists in this laboratory are trying to grasp what they call the holy grail of aquaculture: raising this powerful fish, so prized by sushi lovers, entirely in captivity. But the effort is fraught with challenges.

Small fatty fish like mackerel, herring, sardines and anchovies are high in omega-3s, vitamin D and low on the food chain.

A class of insecticides called neonicotinoids, which are used on a lot of big corn and soybean fields, has been getting a pretty bad rap lately.

In a report issued Tuesday, the White House warned that the cost of inaction when it comes to climate change outweighs the cost of implementing more-stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.

Here's how Time boils down the White House's argument:

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And now a story about an extremely rare albino tree. If you pass it on the street, it might look dead. It's not dead. It was almost killed. But now it's going to survive thanks, in part, to this guy.

This is a trick question. Where would you expect to find the greatest variety of birds?

Downtown, in a city?

Or far, far from downtown — in the fields, forests, mountains, where people are scarce?

Or in the suburbs? In backyards, lawns, parking lots and playing fields?

Not the city, right?

When scientists talk about the destruction of rain forests or the acidification of oceans, we often hear about the tragic loss of plants and animals.

But ecologists at the University of California, Berkeley say there's also a human tragedy that frequently goes unnoticed: As fish and fauna are wiped out, more children around the world are forced to work, and more people are forced into indentured servitude, scientists wrote Thursday in the journal Science.

Outside the northern Guatemalan town of Olopa, near the Honduran border, farmer Edwin Fernando Diaz Viera stands in the middle of his tiny coffee field. He says it was his lifelong dream to own a farm here. The area is renowned for producing some of the world's richest arabica, the smooth-tasting beans beloved by specialty coffee brewers.

"My farm was beautiful; it was big," he says.

But then, a plant fungus called coffee rust, or roya in Spanish, hit his crop.

"Coffee rust appeared and wiped out everything," he says.

An intrepid bird called the red knot migrates from the southern tip of South America to the Arctic and back every year. But changes in climate along its route are putting this ultramarathoner at risk.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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