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Strengthening Communities through Healthy Lifestyles

Today, our communities, our states and the nation face a health epidemic that is having a critical financial and physical impact on the citizens of our country and our health care system at large. Through a speakers’ series, open to the public, Elkhart Rotary proposes to present nationally recognized authorities to address our wellness through the way we eat and exercise and the impact these choices have on our health and wellbeing. Plant-based dietary patterns have been associated with many...
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The number of people using bicycles to get to and from work has more than doubled since 2009. Take Washington D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood. Recent census data show one out of every 10 work trips originating in Shaw is on a bicycle, leading to calls for better bike lanes there.

Have you ever opened your closet and wondered why you bought that hideous sweater? Well, it turns out that maybe you weren’t responsible. Instead, the culprit may be science.

In a new article in The Atlantic, Eleanor Smith delves into the science behind many purchases, looking at 13 different scientific studies that add up to big bucks for retailers, particularly during the holiday season.

How The Holiday Shopping Season Is Changing

8 minutes ago

Cyber Monday may be giving way to Cyber Week, and Black Friday is losing its importance, as more retailers offer deals through the month of November and more shopping is being done online. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the shift in the holiday shopping season.

Amazon has released a glimpse of what its much-anticipated drone deliveries could look like, although it warns the service is still very much in a testing phase.

As the U.S. chowed down on turkey, stuffing and leftovers, Pope Francis visited Uganda, Kenya and the Central African Republic for a six-day trip, continuing his focus on the developing world.

There's a building in Mountain View, Calif., where energy-saving technologies of the future are being tried on for size.

Step inside, and the first thing you notice is the building is dead quiet: no noisy air whooshing through louvers.

That's because the building uses passive cooling instead of traditional air conditioning. Cool ground water passes through a system of small tubes running below the ceiling.

A court in Jerusalem has convicted two Israeli teenagers in the 2014 kidnapping and killing of a 16-year-old Palestinian boy, a crime that heightened tensions in the run-up to the Gaza war that summer.

The two teenagers, who were not named because they are juveniles, are expected to be sentenced in January.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, a ruling on the accused ringleader, 31-year-old Yosef Haim Ben-David, has been delayed. She tells our Newscast unit:

As the United Nations summit on climate change got underway in Paris, protesters have gotten much attention.

Historian Mary Beard has spent her career working through the texts and source materials of ancient Rome. She has written several books on the subject — including her most recent work, SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome — but she doesn't feel like she's close to being done with the topic.

"One of the great things about history is that it sort of isn't a done deal — ever," Beard tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "The historical texts and the historical evidence that you use is always somehow giving you different answers because you're asking it different questions."

The most intractable conflict in modern life is the battle between those who want society to be somehow pure — religiously, say, or racially — and those who see society as an ever-changing mix and actually prefer it that way. You could hardly find a more horrific example of this split than the Islamic State's terror attack on the proudly diverse city of Paris.


WVPE Features

Exciting Programming Changes at WVPE

Morning Edition host Michael Linville speaks with Station Manager Anthony Hunt about new programs on WVPE.
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