2016 IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series Lineup

For the fifth consecutive year IU Health Goshen is providing the essential support needed to make the IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series a reality. Without their generous support, these events simply would not be possible. If given the opportunity, please show your appreciation to the good folks at IU Health Goshen, we certainly appreciate them! June 3 – Meet Me on the Island 5:30 – 9:00pm Memphis Underground The Saint Joseph River and the “island” behind The Century Center in downtown...
Read More

More than a day after a powerful earthquake struck central Italy, rescue teams are desperately searching for survivors in the rubble of once-charming mountain towns.

At least 241 people died in the disaster, according to civil protection officials, The Associated Press reports. Many of the devastated communities are difficult to reach, and the exact number of missing persons isn't known.

The impeachment trial opens today for Brazil's suspended president, Dilma Rousseff, over alleged fiscal mismanagement.

It's the final phase of a long process that could potentially remove her from office, as NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro reports from Rio de Janeiro. "It's really the end of the line," she tells Morning Edition, and says witnesses from the prosecution and defense will appear in the Senate and face questioning.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Marxist rebels and the Colombian government met in Havana on Wednesday night to sign a historic peace accord, marking the end to a guerrilla war that has seethed for more than half a century.

The brutal conflict has killed more than 220,000 people and displaced millions.

'The Couple Next Door' Ratchets Up Parenting Paranoia

3 hours ago

Novels about missing children aren't, well, novel — but there's a special terror for anyone who has loved a baby when the missing child is an infant, unable to walk or climb or otherwise toddle into danger. Shari Lapena's The Couple Next Door examines the blind fear a couple in upstate New York experiences when they return from a dinner party (yes, next door) and discover their beloved daughter is no longer in her crib.

There's no denying it: The architecture on the National Mall commands a kind of weighty reverence. From the neoclassical columns of the Capitol dome to the immense, white marble of the Lincoln Memorial, charm does not seem to have been the design goal for the nation's front lawn. Save for one standout: the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building, which, until this summer, had been chained shut for years.

It's the summer of 1998 and I'm at the mall with my mom and my sister Anna, who has just turned 5. I'm 7. Anna and I are cranky from being too hot, then too cold, then too bored. We keep touching things we are not supposed to touch, and by the time Mom drags us to the register, the cashier seems a little on edge.

"They're mixed, aren't they?" she says. "I can tell by the hair."

Mom doesn't smile, and Mom always smiles. "I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about," she says.

Later, in the kitchen, there is a conversation.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

WVPE Features

A conversation with West Hyler

WVPE Morning Edition host Michael Linville speaks with West Hyler, the director for The University of Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival's production of The Tempest.
Read More