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2015 IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series

August 21 - Meet Me on the Island 5:30 – 9:00 pm Big Daddy Dupree and the Broke & Hungry Blues Band headline the final of the 2015 IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series, Meet Me on the Island. This full-blown nine piece, soul infused blues band is a musical force to be reckoned with. Their selections pay homage to all of the great forefathers of the Blues. Join us as we close out another great season.
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Over the years, scientists have mostly interpreted the world through what they can see. But in the last few decades, a culture of listening has blossomed, especially among biologists who seek to understand how animals communicate. This week Morning Edition embarks on a weekly summer series called Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound. We begin with an innovation that transformed medicine by searching sounds for clues to illness and health.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The cover story of this week's New York magazine is getting a lot of attention.

It features 35 women seated in chairs and one empty chair. The women are all dressed in black, looking straight ahead with both hands resting on their knees. It is a stark image, and all the more compelling because each of them is openly and by name accusing Bill Cosby of horrendous acts. Some say they were drugged and raped; others recount stories of narrowly escaping sexual assault.

One out of every five people in Israel is Arab. But Israeli TV only sets aside a few hours a week for Arabic-language programming. And Arabs in Israel don't have many opportunities to see their own cities and lives reflected on the screen. That's the idea behind a new TV channel. It's called Palestine 48, a reference to the year Israel was founded.

The channel's new morning show is called Our Morning Is Different. It's like an Arabic version of the Today show, with a breezy opening jingle and stock footage of sunlight peeking through a field.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Joss Stone's voice first stunned listeners more than a decade ago. The British singer was only 14 years old then, but her booming, soulful voice got noticed, as did her knack for taking success in stride. At age 28, she hasn't stopped: Stone's newest album, Water for Your Soul, comes out this Friday.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At One Juvenile Hall, Too Few Staff Has A Big Impact

53 minutes ago

Across the country, there are efforts to close outdated and dangerous juvenile detention centers. But even in places with so-called model juvenile halls, counties often struggle to meet the minimum standards.

A juvenile hall in San Leandro, Calif., is one such detention center that's generally well regarded but faces some major challenges. Built in 2007, it's part of a $176 million juvenile justice complex with a detention facility, courtrooms and law offices.

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WVPE Features

Published here by permission of the photographer.

The Shepherd's Life

You read a book about what? You’re recommending a book about what? That’s the reaction I’ve been getting from people, and I can’t blame them. There are sheep on the book’s cover, after all. What does that have to do with our life? Shepherds on harsh yet beautiful mountain farms in a far corner of a distant country? After I finished reading why did I keep thinking about this book—the fiercely independent people, their beloved landscape, their irreverence toward modern society, their most...
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