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Forever Learning Institute Classes Start Sept. 14

The Forever Learning Institute mission is to improve the quality and dignity of senior adult life through continuing intellectual challenge, spiritual reflection, and social interaction. On-site registration takes place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, September 8, 9, and 10 in Room 2/3. Online registration is available now. Teacher orientation is September 11th with classes starting September 14th. The last week of fall classes are November 16th through the 19th....
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A single photo of a drowned Syrian child shocked the world's conscience this week and focused international attention on a conflict that has left a quarter million dead and sent 4 million fleeing in the past four years.

But beyond the powerful emotional impact and a surge in aid donations, will it change the way the international community responds to Syria's war or to the surge of migrants descending on Europe?

Supporters of Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, are planning a demonstration to voice their opposition to her incarceration.

"The Kim Davis Jailhouse Prayer Rally" is set to begin at 11 a.m. today at the Carter County Detention Center. An announcement for the rally, published by Christian News Wire, contends that Davis "is obeying the laws of Kentucky while refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex [couples]."

At first it seems lively outside on the weekend in Baghdad — the lights are bright in open-air cafes, music streams from beribboned cars in a wedding party and at Ali Hussein's juice stand, decorated with plastic bananas, they're squeezing oranges on old brass presses.

But even as Hussein offers me a sharp, fresh juice, he's downcast. When I ask about the subject on everyone's mind here — the migrant flood into Europe — he laughs. "We were just talking about this!" he says. Several of his friends just passed by to say farewell.

More than four years after the 7,400 residents of the Japanese town of Naraha were evacuated after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant melted down in the wake of a devastating tsunami, the government is allowing people to return.

Following several years of decontamination, Naraha is the first town in the area to allow residents to return. It was evacuated in March 2011 after the Fukushima plant was smashed by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami near Sendai, setting off the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

We recorded the show in Louisville, Ky., this week — where Edward Lee is the chef and owner of the restaurant 610 Magnolia. (He says he moved to Louisville from Brooklyn in search of bourbon.) Lee has appeared on Iron Chef America, Top Chef and Mind of a Chef, and he is the author of Smoke & Pickles: Recipes and Stories from a New Southern Kitchen.

Louisville is the capital of horse racing, so we've invited Lee to play a game called "It's just like horse racing, if you pretend they're tiny horses." Three questions about dog racing.

Prediction

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Lightning Fill In The Blank

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Limericks

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Congress Faces A Crazy-Busy September

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The so-called Islamic State continues to wreak a human toll in the Middle East. And in addition to that suffering, the militant organization continues its assault on Syria's cultural heritage.

This week, militants blew up three tombs in the ancient city of Palmyra, and reduced the Greco-Roman Temple of Bel to rubble.

At the same time, ISIS also profits by selling small antiquities on the black market.

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South Bend Stories: Tom Doran

Tom Doran spent 22 years as fireman on the South Bend Fire Department and then entered politics.
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