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2015 IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series

August 21 - Meet Me on the Island 5:30 – 9:00 pm Big Daddy Dupree and the Broke & Hungry Blues Band headline the final of the 2015 IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series, Meet Me on the Island. This full-blown nine piece, soul infused blues band is a musical force to be reckoned with. Their selections pay homage to all of the great forefathers of the Blues. Join us as we close out another great season.
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It's earnings season on Wall Street, and investors are again looking to quarterly reports to gauge the health of companies. Some environmentalists are looking to so-called "sustainability reports" — how companies are improving their ecological footprints. But not all environmentalists are putting so much stock in these reports.

Andrew Hoffman, at the University of Michigan, breaks environmentalists into two colors, or rather shades of a color. First, the perspective of the "dark greens":

Idaho's so-called "ag-gag" law, which outlawed undercover investigations of farming operations, is no more. A judge in the federal District Court for Idaho decided Monday that it was unconstitutional, citing First Amendment protections for free speech.

But what about the other handful of other states with similar laws on the books?

Why 'Pep' The Prison Dog Got Such A Bum Rap

1 hour ago

A 1925 article in The Boston Daily Globe featured a photo of a dog at a radio microphone for a special remote broadcast from a Pennsylvania prison.

He looks like a friendly, dark-haired Labrador. Two prison officers on either side have a hand on his back.

The caption says: This is Pep, "the pet dog Gov. Pinchot of Pennsylvania sentenced to Eastern State Penitentiary for life."

"He had killed the Governor's wife's cat," or so the story went, says Annie Anderson, the historic site researcher at Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia — now a museum.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Rebecca Stead collects ideas before she sits down to write, even from the smallest encounters — like this one:

"The idea came from a girl — she was wearing cat ears, and I said 'nice ears,'" she tells NPR's Melissa Block. "And she said, 'Thanks! I've been wearing them for a year! I don't know why!' And then she ran away."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 WFCR-FM. To see more, visit http://www.nepr.net/.

The ability to store energy could revolutionize the way we make and use electricity. But for many utility companies and regular folks, energy storage is still way out of reach. It's expensive — sometimes more expensive than building out old-fashioned infrastructure like power lines and power plants.

For people like Jim and Lyn Schneider, their decision to invest in battery storage came four years ago when they moved to central Wyoming.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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WVPE Features

Published here by permission of the photographer.

The Shepherd's Life

You read a book about what? You’re recommending a book about what? That’s the reaction I’ve been getting from people, and I can’t blame them. There are sheep on the book’s cover, after all. What does that have to do with our life? Shepherds on harsh yet beautiful mountain farms in a far corner of a distant country? After I finished reading why did I keep thinking about this book—the fiercely independent people, their beloved landscape, their irreverence toward modern society, their most...
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