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Abortion Bill Changed After Returning To Committee

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A House committee altered and then approved an abortion regulation bill after the unusual step of sending the bill from the House floor back to the committee.

The bill mandates doctors tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversed. It also mandates doctors tell patients that no scientifically valid studies verify that practice.

As thousands protested outside the U.K. parliament Monday, members inside debated whether President Donald Trump should receive the honor of meeting the queen on a state visit later this year. State visits by U.S. presidents are rare in Britain; Labour Party lawmaker Paul Flynn noted that only two — Barack Obama and George W. Bush — have made them.

The parliamentary debate was triggered by a petition opposing the state visit, signed by more than 1.8 million people. Another petition supporting a state visit garnered just over 300,000 signatures.

Five people were killed, including four U.S. citizens, when a plane crashed into a shopping complex in suburban Melbourne, Australia, on Tuesday morning, according to police.

The Direct Factory Outlets mall was closed when it was hit by the twin-engine Beechcraft Super King Air, according to media reports. Police say nobody inside the mall at the time was injured.

Many men over 65 with low testosterone levels say their sense of well-being, not to mention sexual function, isn't what it used to be.

That's why some doctors prescribe testosterone supplements. But the effectiveness of testosterone has been controversial. Studies of the risks and benefits have been mixed, and the Food and Drug Administration beefed up its warnings about cardiac side effects of testosterone supplements in 2015.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly unveiled new policies on Tuesday that are aimed at detaining and deporting more immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally.

The two memos, signed by Kelly, lay out a series of steps the department plans to take to implement President Trump's executive orders from late January. Those orders called for increased border security and stricter enforcement of the nation's immigration laws.

In April 1991, I met a young U.S. Army captain in the moonscape of southern Iraq. He was frustrated.

Just weeks earlier, the officer and his troops had been part of the wave of U.S. forces that drove Saddam Hussein's Iraqi military out of Kuwait. The Americans kept advancing, pushing some 150 miles into southern Iraq — but then they received orders to halt in place.

Several Jewish community centers across the U.S. were targeted by bomb threats on Monday, according to the JCC Association of North America, in the fourth wave of such threats in the past two months.

In total, there have been 69 threats at 54 JCCs, in 27 states and a Canadian province, the organization reports — including previous threats on Jan. 9, 18 and 31, as well as 11 threats by telephone on Monday.

Against a backdrop of turmoil and after big losses in November, the Democratic National Committee votes this week for its next leader. The winner of the DNC chair race will likely reflect whether the committee's voting members think it prudent to align their party with the Hillary Clinton-Barack Obama camp, the Bernie Sanders camp — or neither.

Students at Michigan State University can no longer have message whiteboards mounted on their dorm doors, starting this fall. Misuse of the whiteboards has made them more trouble than they're worth.

Kat Cooper is Director of Communications for Residential Services at MSU.  She says too often, students would scrawl offensive comments on the whiteboards. 

"Racist, sexist, anything in that category. Those have happened. There's been issues with them for a long time," says Cooper. "People write things on them that really aren't not part of our value set at MSU."

When Vitaly Churkin was Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman in the early 1990s, he would in effect brief the Moscow press corps twice.

First he'd speak in Russian, formally, behind a lectern.

Then he'd step to the side, his hands folded before him, and wait for the foreign broadcast journalists to approach with their cameras and microphones. The questions and answers were in English, and the audience, it was understood, was the United States.

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An Indiana Mayor On The Way Forward For Democrats

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Democrats are trying to figure out their new role as the minority party in the era of President Trump. In recent weeks, crowds of constituents and activists have begun interrupting Republican town halls, employing some of the tactics of the tea party. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Chanting) Do your job. Do your job. Do your job. GREENE: Do your job, they are shouting. This was a town hall...

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