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When you think of an old map or manuscript, you might picture something yellowed, tattered or even torn because of how long it's been around. But millions of historic documents, from presidential papers to personal slave journals are facing an issue apart from age: a preservation method that has backfired.

In a cold, white room on the first floor of South Carolina's state archives, a dehumidifier keeps a mass of old documents safe.

With security at the U.S.-Mexico border at the center of a seething controversy, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed torn at oral arguments on Tuesday — torn between their sense of justice and legal rules that until now have protected U.S. Border Patrol agents from liability in cross-border shootings.

Americans are driving more than ever before, according to new data released today by the Federal Highway Administration.

Drivers in cars, trucks, minivans and SUVs put a record 3.22 trillion miles on the nation's roads last year, up 2.8 percent from 3.1 trillion miles in 2015.

When the Academy Award nominations were announced in 2015 — and again in 2016 — there was swift backlash against the Academy for the lack of racial diversity among the nominees. Now, a new study of Best Picture nominees has revealed yet another demographic that's been chronically underrepresented in Hollywood — older people.

An overflow crowd  of 250  people worshipped together at the Episcopal Cathedral of St. James at the “Interfaith Service of Prayer for Compassion and Justice for Migrants, Immigrants, & Refugees.”

Lauren Nassau of South Bend, a member of the Temple Beth El synagogue explained why she came.

The human species is about to change dramatically. That's the argument Yuval Noah Harari makes in his new book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow.

Harari is a history professor at Hebrew University in Israel. He tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that he expects we will soon engineer our bodies and minds in the same way we now design products.


Interview Highlights

On how we will begin to engineer bodies

The so-called Islamic State's financial fortunes are bound to the amount of territory it controls.

And the group's dramatic loss of ground in its strongholds in Syria and Iraq is putting pressure on its finances, according to a new report from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

When President Trump has been given the opportunity to talk about anti-Semitism, he has sidestepped the issue multiple times until today, as NPR's Tamara Keith reports

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An Indiana Mayor On The Way Forward For Democrats

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Democrats are trying to figure out their new role as the minority party in the era of President Trump. In recent weeks, crowds of constituents and activists have begun interrupting Republican town halls, employing some of the tactics of the tea party. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Chanting) Do your job. Do your job. Do your job. GREENE: Do your job, they are shouting. This was a town hall...

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