What's Going On...

Strengthening Communities through Healthy Lifestyles

Today, our communities, our states and the nation face a health epidemic that is having a critical financial and physical impact on the citizens of our country and our health care system at large. Through a speakers’ series, open to the public, Elkhart Rotary proposes to present nationally recognized authorities to address our wellness through the way we eat and exercise and the impact these choices have on our health and wellbeing. Plant-based dietary patterns have been associated with many...
Read More

About seven months after Baltimore was rocked by a night of riots, the first police officer implicated in Freddie Gray's death is being put on trial.

As NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports, the case is being closely watched in the city and residents believe that a lot is at stake.

"The broad sentiment is that people want to see convictions out of this trial and they fear that there will be more unrest if that doesn't pan out," Jennifer told Morning Edition.

Leaders from around the world will converge on Paris beginning Nov. 30 for the 2015 U.N. Climate Change Conference. The two-week event is designed to allow countries the chance to come to an agreement on stifling climate change.

Below are 10 questions and answers that should better prepare you for the conference and what to expect during and after its completion.

1. What's at stake and why should I care?

Saying his country will not apologize for downing a Russian war plane, Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu struck a defiant note after meeting with his NATO allies.

The Associated Press reports that Davutoglu said his country was simply defending its airspace last week when two of its F-16s fired at a Russian Sukhoi SU-24.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Nearly 150 world leaders are gathered near Paris for what is being billed as a last-chance summit to avoid catastrophic climate change.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that this is the biggest diplomatic meeting in France since 1948. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Negotiators and heads of state from nearly 200 countries are meeting for the next two weeks near Paris to craft a new treaty to slow global warming.

It's the 21st "Conference of the Parties" held by the United Nations to tackle climate change. One treaty emerged, in 1997, after the conference in Kyoto, Japan. That's no longer in effect, and, in fact, the Kyoto Protocol, as it's known, didn't slow down the gradual warming of the planet.

A generation ago, a high school diploma could open doors, especially to well-paying manufacturing jobs. But today, with technology radically reshaping the U.S. economy, many of those doors have closed. The high school diploma is as important as ever — but as a stepping stone to a higher degree, no longer as a destination.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


WVPE Features

Exciting Programming Changes at WVPE

Morning Edition host Michael Linville speaks with Station Manager Anthony Hunt about new programs on WVPE.
Read More