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Strengthening Communities through Healthy Lifestyles

Today, our communities, our states and the nation face a health epidemic that is having a critical financial and physical impact on the citizens of our country and our health care system at large. Through a speakers’ series, open to the public, Elkhart Rotary proposes to present nationally recognized authorities to address our wellness through the way we eat and exercise and the impact these choices have on our health and wellbeing. Plant-based dietary patterns have been associated with many...
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Protests over racial discrimination on college campuses are leading to some swift responses and pledges of reform by college administrators. Even as the protests themselves appear to be quieting down ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, activists are pledging a prolonged fight.

Throughout history, atrocities have been committed in the name of medical research.

Nazi doctors experimented on concentration camp prisoners. American doctors let poor black men with syphilis go untreated in the Tuskegee study. The list goes on.

A federal appeals court decision will allow the Obama administration to maintain the secrecy of internal memos regarding drone attacks against suspected terrorists abroad.

The three judge panel unanimously rejected Freedom of Information Act requests brought by the American Civil Liberties Union and The New York Times.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



The Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said Tuesday that the man believed to have orchestrated the Paris attacks, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, had planned more attacks before he was killed by police on Nov. 18. Molins also said Abaaoud returned to the scenes of the attacks even as the horror he crafted was still unfolding.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports for the Newscast unit:

"Speaking at a press conference, Molins said Abaaoud returned to the scene of the café attacks and was outside the concert hall even as SWAT teams were entering to put an end to the carnage.

The Canadian government has had to scale back ambitious plans to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year.

The pledge by Canada's new prime minister, Justin Trudeau, to bring in the refugees helped sweep him to power in last month's elections. But the Paris attacks and the daunting logistics of the plan forced Canada to extend that deadline.

The government unveiled its updated plans on Tuesday. Its says it hopes to resettle 10,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year and another 15,000 by the end of February.

"The reality is this outbreak's not over," says Dr. William Fischer, speaking about Ebola. "It's just changed."

Fischer, a professor at the University of North Carolina who's been studying Ebola survivors, was speaking about the new cases in Liberia. On Monday, a 15-year-old died of the disease. The teenager's father and brother have also tested positive for Ebola. Health authorities have not yet determined how the family was infected.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


WVPE Features

Exciting Programming Changes at WVPE

Morning Edition host Michael Linville speaks with Station Manager Anthony Hunt about new programs on WVPE.
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