2016 IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series Lineup

For the fifth consecutive year IU Health Goshen is providing the essential support needed to make the IU Health Goshen Entertainment Series a reality. Without their generous support, these events simply would not be possible. If given the opportunity, please show your appreciation to the good folks at IU Health Goshen, we certainly appreciate them! June 3 – Meet Me on the Island 5:30 – 9:00pm Memphis Underground The Saint Joseph River and the “island” behind The Century Center in downtown...
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Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, is known for his outspoken personality and oversize public image, which he believes help build his brand name.

"Whether it's good press or bad press, it's getting your name out there," Washington Post investigative reporter Michael Kranish tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "Getting your name on the gossip pages and the front pages and even the sports pages, [is] all in the effort of building the name."

When companies know about problems, they’re often reluctant to admit them publicly.

But it’s better when they do, because when the media exposes their problems, the negative publicity can do lasting damage. Recent examples include Volkswagen and Theranos.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti hears more from Curt Nickisch, senior editor at Harvard Business Review.

The National Parks Service has been making an effort to get more people, especially young people and minorities, to visit and to care about America’s parks.

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson talks with U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, who oversees the National Park Service, about those efforts, as well as the challenges of climate change, funding, congestion and whether the Obama Administration will protect more public land before he leaves office.

Former Fox News host Andrea Tantaros filed a lawsuit yesterday. She claims that Roger Ailes and Fox News executives punished her for complaining about sexual harassment.

NPR’s David Folkenflik joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the latest media news, including the Tantaros lawsuit and coverage of the U.S. Olympic swimmers’ robbery allegations in Rio.

Hey Hugh.

It's us, the sideburns you wore while you played the character Wolverine. All the times you played Wolverine. To refresh your memory: When Wolverine 3 comes out next year, we'll have been together, the three of us, for nine movies over the course of 17 years.

Seventeen years, Hugh. Do you know what anniversary that is? It's the furniture anniversary. We were gonna make you a footstool!

As Stanford undergrads get ready for the fall semester, the university's administrators have issued a new mandate: Pack your books and calculators, but leave the fifths and handles at home.

On Monday, just over a month before classes resume, the university announced a set of changes to its alcohol policy.

Hard liquor will now be completely banned from on-campus parties — unless the party is hosted by groups exclusively for graduate students, and in that case, only mixed drinks are allowed. "Straight shots of hard alcohol are never allowed at any party," the school says.

Paleontologists at the University of New South Wales in Australia say they have identified a tiny new species of marsupial lion that lived around 18 million years ago.

The extinct, squirrel-size animal weighed about 1.3 pounds, very likely lived in trees and had teeth that suggest it was capable of ripping apart other small creatures with its molars.

The researchers named it Microleo attenboroughi in honor of Sir David Attenborough, the famed British naturalist who has hosted numerous documentaries on wildlife.

Early mornings are routine for 69-year-old Hiroyuko Yamamoto. He's typically at a busy intersection in the city of Matsudo, near Tokyo, where he volunteers as a school crossing guard. But one rainy morning a little over a year ago, an old woman caught his attention

She was pushing a bicycle. She was kind of disheveled. Despite the rain, she didn't have an umbrella. When Yamamoto spoke to the woman, she said she was trying to get to the city of Kamisuwa. That's about four hours away by train.

A U.S. service member was killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan's restive Helmand province Tuesday — the second U.S. combat death in Afghanistan since January.

The service member was conducting "train, advise, assist activities" with Afghan forces when the explosive device went off, according to the U.S. Defense Department. Another American service member and six Afghan soldiers were wounded in the attack near the provincial capital, Lashkar Gah.

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WVPE Features

A conversation with West Hyler

WVPE Morning Edition host Michael Linville speaks with West Hyler, the director for The University of Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival's production of The Tempest.
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