Marketplace

FM/HD1: Weekdays 6:30-7:00 pm; HD2: Weekdays 6:00-6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

With in-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets, Marketplace is timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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02/19/18: Life after a mass shooting

15 hours ago

A couple of weeks ago on this show, we told you about some of the funding and resources available for mass shooting victims to help with their short-term recovery. Today, we consider what life and work is like five, or even ten years after surviving a high-profile shooting. Two survivors of a mass shooting describe long term recovery. Also on today's show, we continue with our project called "Divided Decade," as we hear stories of how people's lives changed since the financial crisis ten years ago.

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 

Even dogs need to have experience to get a job

Feb 19, 2018

After a year and a half of basic coursework, six months of professional training, and a final exam, Patch — a Labrador-golden retriever mix — was ready to become an assistance dog for Annette Ramirez.

Ramirez, a 53-year-old resident from Manhattan Beach, California, is a quadruple amputee who lost her limbs due to a medical mishap that occurred when she was undergoing a hysterectomy back in 2012.

The economics of presidential libraries

Feb 19, 2018

There’s more to Presidents Day than furniture and mattress sales. It’s a day when we recall the men who’ve held the country’s highest office. Thirteen presidents have libraries to jog the collective memory. We look at the economics of two presidential libraries.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

New tax law includes incentives for poor areas

Feb 19, 2018

A line item in the tax law creates a new Opportunity Zone program, with incentives to draw business to underdeveloped places. This strategy has been tried by former administrations, and state and local governments, with results that have often been disappointing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

02/19/2018: Opportunities in the new tax law

Feb 19, 2018

(U.S. Edition) There's a section in the new tax law that aims to help chronically poor, underdeveloped areas in the U.S. The law creates an Opportunity Zones program, which gives incentives to draw businesses to these regions. But do they actually work? We'll dive into that question on today's show. Afterwards, we'll look at the group that President Trump's 2019 budget would most likely impact — if it were to go into effect. Plus: We discuss the economics of two presidential libraries: Ronald Reagan's in California and Herbert Hoover's in Iowa.

Tim Armstrong: People need to vote on net neutrality

Feb 19, 2018

Less than a year ago, Yahoo and AOL officially merged after AOL’s parent company, Verizon, bought Yahoo for more than $4 billion. Since then, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has moved on to an unannounced venture. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has had the job of blending the two companies into a digital content behemoth named Oath, vying to challenge Facebook and Google for advertising revenue. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Armstrong about how Oath fits in the digital media landscape at the Makers conference in Los Angeles earlier this month.

The Source Code: Tim Armstrong

Feb 19, 2018

Tim Armstrong worked at Google for years, then as the head of AOL. Now he's the CEO of Oath, the company that was created when Verizon bought Yahoo, and Yahoo and AOL merged. In this long cut of the interview, Armstrong talks about the future of digital content, as well as the awkwardness of sponsoring a women’s leadership conference that doesn’t have former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer at it.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … There are calls for the boss of Latvia’s central bank to step down after he was detained over the weekend by the nation’s anti-corruption agency while his home and offices were raided. We’ll explain what’s next for the country’s banking system. Then, new details as a $1.7 billion fraud at India’s Punjab National Bank continues to unravel after the story came to light late last week. Afterwards, how De Beers is using blockchain technology to help make diamonds conflict free.

Less than a year ago, Yahoo and AOL officially merged after AOL’s parent company, Verizon, bought Yahoo for more than $4 billion. Since then, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has moved on to an unannounced venture. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has had the job of blending the two companies into a digital content behemoth named Oath, vying to challenge Facebook and Google for advertising revenue. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Armstrong about how Oath fits in the digital media landscape at the Makers conference in Los Angeles. The early February conference was sponsored in part by Oath.

This was supposed to be infrastructure week, remember? It turned out a little bit differently. Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post and Nela Richardson of Redfin joined us to talk about it. With the recent jobs report stirring fears of inflation, are we worrying too much about rising prices in the economy? Then: We're going to be borrowing a lot of money in this economy over the next eight to 10 years, yet White House advisers, including Council of Economic Advisers chair Kevin Hassett have basically said, "Deficits? Meh." We'll explain the fiscal flip-flop in the Republican Party.

What TV can teach the movie business about diversity

Feb 16, 2018

Tanya Saracho is the creator and showrunner of the Starz original scripted drama “Vida,” which centers around two Mexican-American sisters who return to east Los Angeles after their mother dies. While preparing to put the final touches to an episode with her editor, Saracho reflected on how all this was made possible, thanks to a meeting with Marta Fernandez, the senior vice president of Original Programming at the Starz network. “To have an executive who was Hispanic was amazing, ‘cause you don’t go into these meetings and see, you know, people like you,” she said.

That emoji you just tweeted could determine the next ad you see

Feb 16, 2018

What do egglplant, fire and the number 100 all have in common? They're all emojis that have twisted and evolved in meaning.

As those little digital images change how we communicate, they've also transformed how advertisers track our interests.

Since 2016, Twitter has sold data of people’s emoji use to advertisers, allowing companies to send people specific ads based on the emojis they tweet.

Do corporate wellness programs work?

Feb 16, 2018

Robert Granger stands on a thick, blue, padded mat and stares up a rock-climbing wall covered in rainbow-colored, hand-and-foot holds. It looks like like someone threw a handful of skittles at the wall and they stuck.

“It’s a really good place to unwind and think about something else,” he said, during breaks between ascents. “The nice thing is you have to use your mind, as well as body, doing this. It takes your mind off anything else.” 

What does the gender wage gap sound like?

Feb 16, 2018

The U.S. lags behind Iceland, Rwanda and Nicaragua when it comes to pay equity for women. That's according to a recent report from the World Economic Forum. In the U.S., on average, women earn 80 cents for every dollar men make, according to the Department of Labor. Why? There are more men work in higher-earning professions. But sometimes men just get paid more. When women find out a male colleague is making more money for the exact same job, it can spur them to action.

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