Marketplace

FM/HD1: Weekdays 6:30-7:00 pm; HD2: Weekdays 6:00-6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

With in-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets, Marketplace is timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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Key stock indicators are down again this morning. The possible cause this time? Washington politics. Susan Schmidt from Westwood Holdings Group explains why uncertainty over the House GOP's health care bill could be affecting the stock market's movement. We'll also look at why there may be a decline in existing home sales for February, and then explore the rise of virtual reality exhibits at museums. 

 

What it's like to live and work in H-1B visa limbo

7 hours ago
Sally Herships

This is the part in a story where normally we’d introduce you to a character to help draw you in and set the scene. But almost all the foreign workers on H-1B visas that I talked to — and I spoke to more than 10 people — won't let me tell you their names. They’re too scared.

I received a lot of emails like these:

 

 

And this:

Existing home sales numbers for February are out today. January sales increased 3.3 percent to a 10-year high, but economists anticipate a dip for February, although that’s still up from last year. One factor: an improving job market. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to advance the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin a decade ago and proposed an ambitious political strategy to undermine anti-Russian opposition across former Soviet republics, The Associated Press has learned. The work appears to contradict assertions by the Trump administration and Manafort himself that he never worked for Russian interests.

Wastewater: our most overlooked water source?

11 hours ago

March 22 is World Water Day, and this year’s theme is wastewater. The United Nations is hoping to shed light on the value of all the water we literally flush down the toilet. Other countries use wastewater, but the idea hasn’t taken hold in the U.S.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

03/22/17: Why wastewater is actually a commodity

13 hours ago
Marketplace

Stock index futures are down again this morning. What could be giving investors pause? Economist Jeffrey Cleveland from Payden and Rygel stopped by to explain the economic data that shows how optimistic Americans are really feeling. Next, we'll explore the tough market for reused water, and then report on the difficulties foreign men and women have in trying to obtain H-1B visas. 

03/22/17: Shattering stereotypes about programmers

13 hours ago
Marketplace

Ads on YouTube have been running next to videos with content that could be defined as hate speech. After receiving complaints from advertisers, the site is now changing its policies. We'll take a look at the new settings YouTube will provide companies with to avoid the issue in the future. Afterwards, we'll chat with Joel Spolsky, the CEO of Stack Overflow, about why some developers feel underpaid and the skills required to succeed in the profession.

 

 

Annie Baxter

This story is from our special series that explores NAFTA’s role in our economy from the perspective of workers, business owners and trade negotiators. What exactly is NAFTA? And what happens if it changes?  Join us to discuss how one of the most hotly contested issues in our society shapes the way we live.

The latest travel ban targets electronic devices

Mar 21, 2017
Reema Khrais

There’s news today of another travel-related ban from the Trump administration, but this one impacts what happens when you get on the plane. Passengers coming to the U.S. on direct flights from eight countries in the Middle East and North Africa will not be able to carry anything larger than a smartphone on the plane.

Administration officials cite security for the new travel restrictions, but they didn’t point to any specific threat. Some of the people who will be most impacted are business travelers, and it’s also not good news for airlines in the region.

Kai Ryssdal

We use a lot of words to talk about problems in the economy: inflation, CPI, GDP, the jobless rate. But LIBOR? That stands for the London Interbank Offered Rate, and it's one of the most important numbers in the world. In fact, it's an interest rate that trillions of dollars depend upon each day. During the height of the financial crisis, one London banker decided he could make a lot of money if he just fudged that number. And he did, until he was caught.

9: Everything or nothing is a crisis

Mar 21, 2017
Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood

The FBI director testified on Capitol Hill, confirmation hearings begin for Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch and more changes to the health care bill. And that was just Monday. We take a look at what happens when everything, or maybe nothing, is a crisis. Spoiler alert: It all depends on your point of view. 

Alyssa Mastromonaco talks to us about what it was like in the White House under President Barack Obama and her new book, "Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?" Also, she answers our Make Me Smart question, and you do, too. 

 

 

On Thursday night, the House is expected to vote on a bill to repeal Obamacare. The only hurdle is Republicans themselves. House leaders are desperate to get enough conservatives on board to get the bill to the Senate, so last night they made some changes to it. One sweetener: letting states add work requirements to Medicaid eligibility rules.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

03/21/17: GOP tweaks health care bill

Mar 21, 2017

The House GOP is out with some revisions for its Obamacare replacement, with the aim of drawing more support for the bill. We'll look at what some of these proposed changes are, which include more tax credits. Next, we'll explore Emory University's decision to call itself a "safe harbor" instead of a "sanctuary campus" over concerns that it could be defunded. And finally, we'll talk about the other competition happening amid March Madness: the shoe companies vying to be number one on the market.

03/21/2017: The unintended consequences of NAFTA

Mar 21, 2017
Annie Baxter

It's NAFTA week here, so today we're heading to the Midwest. The trade deal opened up the Mexican market to American farmers, who enjoyed billions in exports. But Mexican farmers couldn't compete, and many of them immigrated to the U.S. illegally after going out of business. Then: We'll talk with the American and Canadian architects of NAFTA about how they negotiated the agreement in the first place. Plus, we'll unpack the latest travel restriction's impact on business travelers and look ahead to the House's big health care vote.

What a baseball game has to do with the NAFTA negotiations

Mar 21, 2017
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

This story is from our special series that explores NAFTA’s role in our economy from the perspective of workers, business owners and trade negotiators. What exactly is NAFTA? And what happens if it changes?  Join us to discuss how one of the most hotly contested issues in our society shapes the way we live.

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