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High deductible health plans are the new normal.

Just over half of employees this year have a health insurance policy with a deductible of at least $1,000, according to a survey of employers from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

It's the continuation of a multiyear trend of companies passing more of the costs of employee health care back onto workers.

Copyright 2016 KCUR-FM. To see more, visit KCUR-FM.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Fourteen self-driving Ford Fusions idle in front of Uber's Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh.

On each vehicle, dozens of stationary and spinning cameras collect 1.4 million distance measurements per second, guiding the car on its journey.

Beginning Wednesday, the cars will be deployed on Pittsburgh's streets in a striking experiment by Uber to introduce self-driving technology to its passengers.

A federal agency used her Wells Fargo unit as a cautionary tale, imposing the largest fine it's ever levied. Her bank fired some 5,300 employees for acting "counter to our values." But questions are now circulating about Carrie Tolstedt, the unit's leader, who's set to depart her post with $124.6 million in stock and options, and whose compensation for the five years targeted by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau included a yearly incentive bonus of $5.5 million in stock, to go along with her base pay and other bonuses.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Doctors Test Drones To Speed Up Delivery Of Lab Tests

21 hours ago

Three years ago, Geoff Baird bought a drone. The Seattle dad and hobby plane enthusiast used the 2.5-pound quadcopter to photograph the Hawaiian coastline and film his son's soccer and baseball games.

The World Anti-Doping Agency says a Russian cyber-espionage group named the Tsar Team, also known as APT28 or Fancy Bear, broke into its database and accessed athlete's data. The hackers saw confidential medical data and have released some of the information, WADA says.

Some of the data listed athletes' therapeutic use exemptions, which allow banned substances to be taken if they're deemed to be necessary for an athlete to cope with an illness or medical condition.

More Americans are making more money.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new numbers on Tuesday showing that, after a brutal economic recession and years of stagnation, real median household incomes rose from $53,718 in 2014 to $56,516 last year. That's a 5.2 percent rise — the first statistically significant increase since 2007.

But, as NPR's Pam Fessler notes, "the median household income was still lower than it was in 2007."

The tables turned for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton over the weekend. For much of the campaign, Clinton has been sitting back, staying quiet and allowing Trump's gaffes, offensive statements and flip-flops to take up the news cycle.

At 27, Sara Blakely was selling fax machines and desperate to reinvent her life. So she came up with Spanx — hosiery that eliminates panty lines — and set to work building her business.

During the seven years Blakely sold fax machines door-to-door, she faced a lot of rejection. Check out how she dealt with it and what kept her going:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Louisiana Flooding Swamps Agriculture

Sep 10, 2016

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

As Louisiana continues the clean-up of flood-damaged buildings and homes, farmers face another set of problems. Many corn, soybean, sugar and rice fields were flooded with several feet of water. As Tegan Wendland at member station WWNO reports, farmers are trying to figure out what comes next.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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