Economy & Innovation

All Tech Considered
5:40 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Pro-ISIS Messages Create Dilemma For Social Media Companies

Zarine Khan (right) and Shafi Khan, parents of Mohammed Hamzah Khan, speak to reporters in Chicago Oct. 9 after a federal hearing for their 19-year-old son, accused of trying to join Islamic State militants in Syria.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 5:52 pm

Last year alone, the FBI reports, around 20 American citizens were detained trying to travel to Syria to join militants fighting for the so-called Islamic State. According to law enforcement officials, ISIS and other terrorist organizations are increasingly adept at using social media to recruit from abroad.

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Code Switch
5:16 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia

New apartment buildings are replacing empty lots in Mantua, one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods.
Will Figg for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 5:58 pm

Dinner is served in the West Philadelphia neighborhood of Mantua.

"You look like you're ready to have a great Dornsife neighborhood partnership meal! Am I right about it?" Rose Samuel-Evans asks the crowd at a free community dinner of chicken marsala and stuffed flounder hosted by Drexel University.

Samuel-Evans works in this two-story, orange-brick schoolhouse; it's one of three refurbished buildings that opened last summer north of campus as part of Drexel's Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships.

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All Tech Considered
5:16 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

With 'Discover' Feature, Snapchat Bucks Social Trend In News

The Snapchat Discover user interface.
Snapchat

When it comes to the news — what its contents are and how it is delivered — who knows best? This conversation has been taking place as newsrooms go digital and social. This week the messaging app Snapchat weighed in, launching a new feature called Discover.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Report: The Increasingly Unequal States Of America

An oil well near Tioga, North Dakota.
KAREN BLEIER AFP/Getty Images

A study released this week supports previous reporting that income growth in America has been lopsided ever since the economy began to bounce back from the recent recession.

The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit think tank, examined federal tax data, state-by-state, and found the national trend of lopsided growth persists. The center's report is titled The Increasingly Unequal States Of America.

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1:19 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Indiana Farmers See Record Popcorn Crop

Farmers in the Hoosier state planted a total of 91,000 acres of corn used to make popcorn.
Indiana farmers saw a record popcorn crop last year, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Farmers planted a total of 91,000 acres of corn used to make popcorn - more than ever before. The state's production totaled 432 million pounds of corn.
The Two-Way
6:03 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Obama's Budget Would Undo Broad, Automatic Cuts Made In 2013

President Obama speaks to the media after the automatic budget cuts associated with the sequester took effect in March 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 9:07 am

When President Obama meets with House Democrats tonight during their retreat in Philadelphia, officials say he'll lay out the details of his budget proposal, which will include reversal of large cuts to federal spending instituted in 2013.

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Business
5:33 am
Thu January 29, 2015

After Weak Earnings, McDonald's CEO Steps Down

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 7:50 am

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NPR Story
5:03 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Why Don't More People Short Stocks? It's A Great Way To Lose Big Bucks

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 7:50 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Economy
4:14 am
Thu January 29, 2015

For Long-Haul Drivers, Cheap Gas Means A Sweeter Commute

Jed Brown drives 100 miles each day to work between Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Cheaper gas is making his commute more manageable, but he doesn't expect the low prices to last.
Uri Berliner NPR

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 8:21 am

With wages still stuck for many Americans, the big drop in gasoline prices is the equivalent of an unexpected cash bonus for the nation's drivers.

The average American household is expected to save $750 this year from lower gas prices, according to the Energy Department.

But Thomas Kinnaman, an economist at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., says it's instructive to look beyond the word "average."

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The Two-Way
6:25 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Charles Townes, Laser Pioneer, Black Hole Discoverer, Dies At 99

Nobel Prize-winning physicist Charles Townes was single-minded about a lot of things, colleagues say. And also a very nice guy.
Julian Wasser The LIFE Images Collection/Getty

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 10:18 am

Charles Townes, a physicist who won the Nobel Prize for his part in the invention of the laser died Tuesday at 99.

Townes is best remembered for thinking up the basic principles of the laser while sitting on a park bench. Later in life he advised the U.S. government and helped uncover the secrets of our Milky Way galaxy.

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