Economy & Innovation

All Tech Considered
5:15 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Facebook Apologizes For Name Policy That Affected LGBT Community

San Francisco City Supervisor David Campos (right) walks with drag queen Sister Roma to a news conference on Sept. 17 about a Facebook policy that requires people to use their "real" names on their profiles. The site said Wednesday it will modify how the policy is enforced.
Eric Risberg AP

Facebook has apologized for a policy that drew criticism from LGBT groups after it led to the deactivation of dozens of accounts belonging to drag queens. While the policy itself will stay in place, Facebook says, it will be changing how the rule is enforced.

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The Two-Way
5:16 am
Wed October 1, 2014

Sen. Warren: We Need Regulators Who 'Work For The American People'

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, of Massachusetts, speaks to a group of supporters at a rally in support of Kentucky Democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes in June.
Timothy D. Easley AP

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 8:39 am

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, says newly released recordings of conversations between Federal Reserve officials show that the same kind of cozy relationships that led to the 2008 financial crisis still dominate Wall Street.

In an interview with Morning Edition, Warren says the recordings provide definite proof of that relationship.

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Economy
5:10 am
Wed October 1, 2014

Transcript: Sen. Warren's Full NPR Interview On Financial Regulation

"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down in June. It was a question she came back to repeatedly in an NPR interview on the Goldman Sachs bailout and federal regulation of the financial sector.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 9:17 am

NPR's Steve Inskeep interviewed Sen. Elizabeth Warren about the audio tapes made by Carmen Segarra, a Federal Reserve Bank of New York investigator who was examining Goldman Sachs. A full transcript of the interview follows:

STEVE INSKEEP: You described what you learned from this report as disturbing. What's disturbing about it?

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All Tech Considered
3:46 am
Wed October 1, 2014

'Ello' Aims For A Return To Ad-Free Social Networking

Ello is a new, invitation-only social network that aims to thrive and survive on a business model that does not include selling user data or advertising.
Ello.co

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 12:17 pm

Vermont is known for its green pastures, farmsteads and roads free of billboards. The founders of the new social network Ello live in the state, and they want to bring Vermont-like serenity to the Internet.

"We set out to prove that a social network will survive and thrive that doesn't have a business model of selling ads to its users," says CEO and co-founder Paul Budnitz.

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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

New York Boosts Pay For Thousands With Hourly Wage Hike

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signs an executive order raising the city's living wage law Tuesday. The move will require some employers to pay their employees between $11.50 and $13.13 an hour, depending on whether the employee receives benefits.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order Tuesday that effectively raises the hourly wage for thousands of workers in New York City. The city says its expansion of the Living Wage provisions will boost yearly earnings for the lowest-paid workers from $16,640 to $27,310.

From New York, NPR's Joel Rose reports:

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All Tech Considered
5:06 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

EBay Spins Off PayPal Into Fast-Changing World Of Mobile Payments

EBay announced it will split from the payments service PayPal, forming two independently traded companies beginning in 2015.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 6:46 pm

A big breakup is happening in the business world. Online retailing giant eBay is splitting up with its payments operation, PayPal, sometime in 2015. The move comes at a prime opportunity for PayPal, as the future of online payments is still being charted.

When PayPal first came on the scene in the late 1990s, it simplified making online purchases in a way that users adopted, fast.

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Law
5:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

U.S. Judge Holds Argentina In Contempt After Debt Default

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 1:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR Ed
5:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Kids And Screen Time: Cutting Through The Static

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 6:46 pm

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

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The Salt
3:38 am
Tue September 30, 2014

European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken'

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 1:46 pm

Mute Schimpf doesn't want to eat American chicken. That's because most U.S. poultry is chilled in antimicrobial baths that can include chlorine to keep salmonella and other bacteria in check. In Europe, chlorine treatment was banned in the 1990s out of fear that it could cause cancer.

"In Europe there is definitely a disgust about chlorinated chicken," says Schimpf, a food activist with Friends of the Earth Europe, an environmental group.

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All Tech Considered
7:07 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Hands-Free, Mind-Free: What We Lose Through Automation

NPR's Robert Siegel and Michael Minielly, a Mercedes-Benz representative, drive a new S550 4Matic, which allows for semi-autonomous driving.
Rob Ballenger NPR

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 9:04 pm

Nicholas Carr's books are the nagging, tech-wary conscience of the digital age. In The Shallows, he warned that surfing the Internet is destroying our attention span.

Now in his new book, The Glass Cage, Carr warns us that computers are making more and more decisions for us, and we risk forgetting how to make those decisions ourselves.

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