Education

Parallels
3:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 3:39 pm

In South Korea, grim stories of teen suicide come at a regular clip. Recently, two 16-year-old girls in the city of Daejeon jumped to their deaths, leaving a note saying, "We hate school."

It's just one tragedy in a country where suicide is the leading cause of death among teens, and 11- to 15-year-olds report the highest amount of stress out of 30 developed nations.

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Law
4:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Atlanta Educators Handed Sentences In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:52 am

In a fiery sentencing hearing Tuesday, a judge in Atlanta lashed out at some of the 10 former educators convicted in a grade-changing scandal. Prosecutors offered reduced sentences in exchange for apologies, but most of the former educators chose not to do that and received lengthy prison terms.

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NPR Ed
12:00 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

If Walls Could Talk: What Lead Is Doing To Our Students

Peeling lead paint in a New York City apartment. Many buildings built before 1960 still have high amounts of lead.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:04 pm

Every child's ability to succeed in school is influenced by lots of external factors: teacher quality, parenting, poverty, geography, to name a few. But far less attention has been paid to the power of a child's bedroom walls. Or, rather, the paint that's on them and the lead that may be in that paint.

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Jail Terms Handed To Most Atlanta Teachers Convicted In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 8:53 pm

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET

Two of the 10 former Atlanta public school employees convicted this month of conspiring to cheat on state tests to earn raises and bonuses took plea deals Tuesday while the others received jail time of between one and seven years.

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Politics
6:13 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Senate Attempts To Revise No Child Left Behind Measure

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 8:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Environment
4:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Harvard Students Block Campus Building To Push Fossil Fuel Divestment

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 2:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Student activists are demonstrating in Harvard Yard, demanding that the world's wealthiest university sell its shares in big oil and coal companies. From member station WGBH, Kirk Carapezza reports.

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Law
4:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Sentencing Begins For Atlanta Teachers Convicted In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Ed
4:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Senators Try To Revise No Child Left Behind — A Few Years Behind

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher.
Yoichi Okamoto LBJ Presidential Library

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:53 pm

News flash: Members of the U.S. Senate will work across party lines Tuesday for the sake of America's students.

Well, at least for a few more days.

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Education
8:56 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Students Push College Fossil Fuel Divestment To Stigmatize Industry

Alumnus Will Lawrence of the Fossil Fuel Divestment Student Network came back to Swarthmore to help the students effectively communicate their protest to the school's administrators.
Emily Cohen NewsWorks

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

In the past few years, students at hundreds of colleges and universities have started pushing their schools to divest from fossil fuel companies as a way to slow climate change.

The campaign has had some notable wins in the past year. But at tiny Swarthmore College, outside of Philadelphia, where the movement was born, students have been staging a sit-in for nearly a month to try to make their voices heard.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sat April 11, 2015

New Research Shows Free Online Courses Didn't Grow As Expected

Student Raul Ramos goes through his online homework during a session of a massive open online class, or MOOC, in Madrid, Spain.
Andres Kudacki AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 12:02 pm

Remember the MOOC?

Just a few years ago, the Massive Open Online Course was expected to reinvent higher education. Millions of people were signing up to watch Web-based, video lectures from the world's great universities. Some were completing real assignments, earning certificates and forming virtual study groups — all for free.

Surely the traditional college degree would instantly collapse.

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