Education

The Two-Way
5:43 pm
Mon December 8, 2014

America's Highest-Paid Private-University President Made $7.1 Million In 2012

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson holds 2005 commencement exercises in Troy, N.Y. Jackson is one of three dozen presidents of private colleges and universities who made more than $1 million in 2012.
Tim Roske AP

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 7:16 pm

It's a pretty good time to be president of a private college, at least financially. The Chronicle of Higher Education just released its annual roundup of executive compensation for private college presidents, and it reports that Shirley Ann Jackson of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute earned $7.1 million in 2012 alone. (2012 is the latest year federal tax documents with this information are currently available.)

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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Mon December 8, 2014

Fallout From 'Rolling Stone' Story Changes Conversation At UVA

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 10:49 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Mon December 8, 2014

End Fraternities' Suspension, UVA Urged Amid 'Rolling Stone' Fallout

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 3:00 pm

Three national organizations are calling on the University of Virginia to reinstate fraternities and sororities after an acknowledgment last week by Rolling Stone magazine of "discrepancies" in its story on gang rape.

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NPR Ed
9:25 am
Mon December 8, 2014

Kids' Drawings Speak Volumes About Home

Examples of a family drawing assessment: A drawing from a child scored with minimal indicators of family dysfunction (top), and one from a child scored with elevated levels of family dysfunction (bottom).
W. Roger Mills-Koonce

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 12:10 pm

When children reach 6 years old, their drawings matter.

Not because of those purple unicorns or pinstripe dragons but because of how kids sketch themselves and the very real people in their lives.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Sat December 6, 2014

Q&A: J Is For Jihad

Columbia University Press

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 8:21 am

Letter M (capital M and small m): (Mujahid): My brother is a Mujahid. Afghan Muslims are Mujahideen. I do Jihad together with them. Doing Jihad against infidels is our duty.

These words come from a textbook written to teach first-graders Pashto, one of the two official languages of Afghanistan. In the primer, eight of the 41 letters of the alphabet contain similar references, to guns, swords and defending the homeland against infidels.

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Around the Nation
4:47 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

'Rolling Stone' Walks Back On Sexual Assault Story At UVA

Originally published on Fri December 5, 2014 6:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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50 Great Teachers
1:03 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

What The Movies Taught Us About Teaching

Denzel Washington in The Great Debaters.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 2:09 pm

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Around the Nation
3:35 am
Fri December 5, 2014

A Miami School Goes From Blank Canvas To Mural-Covered

Leza One paints a mural on a wall of Jose de Diego Middle School in Miami's Wynwood neighborhood. It's a project that coincides with the citywide Art Basel fair.
Greg Allen NPR

Originally published on Fri December 5, 2014 1:07 pm

Miami's Jose de Diego Middle School, like many schools in South Florida designed to provide hurricane protection and energy efficiency, has few windows and large expanses of facade almost begging for decoration.

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NPR Ed
5:06 am
Thu December 4, 2014

Teachers Go Door-Knocking In Nashville

Teachers in Nashville, Tenn., are knocking on doors to recruit students for public school.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 6:04 pm

It's Saturday in East Nashville, Tenn., and LaTonya White finds herself knocking on a stranger's door. It's awkward. Someone peers out at her through the window. White looks away, pretending not to notice. After an uncomfortable few seconds, the door finally cracks open. White seizes her chance:

"My name is LaTonya White. I'm the principal at Rosebank Elementary School. How are you doing?" she asks, glancing at the clipboard in her hands. On it: a list of families in the area with soon-to-be kindergartners. "Yes, you should have a child ready to come to school soon."

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NPR Ed
4:29 pm
Wed December 3, 2014

In Rural Alabama, Fighting HIV With A Game

The local middle school plays its annual homecoming football game at Wilcox Central High in Camden, Alabama.
Dan Carsen WBHM

Originally published on Thu December 4, 2014 10:34 am

HIV was once considered an urban problem. Now, parts of the rural South — where the stigma is strong but health resources and education are not – has some of the highest rates in the nation.

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