Education

NPR Story
5:02 am
Fri May 1, 2015

White House Honors 2015 Teacher Of The Year: Shanna Peeples

Originally published on Fri May 1, 2015 11:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Ed
4:53 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

The Plan To Give E-Books To Poor Kids

President Obama announced an initiative to give e-books to low-income students while visiting the Anacostia Library in Washington on Thursday.
Shawn Thew /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 8:19 pm

Brown Bear, Brown Bear what do you see?

I see a blue horse, a purple cat, and a new program — unveiled today by President Obama — with one goal in mind:

To put good books in the hands of low-income kids.

More specifically, $250 million worth of e-books available to young, low-income readers — free. The effort will work through a new app, being developed by the New York Public Library, that has the buy-in of all the major publishers.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Skip A Grade? Start Kindergarten Early? It's Not So Easy

A.J. Rich iStock

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 10:36 am

On the first day of school, perhaps the only person more discussed than the "new kid" is the "new kid who skipped a grade."

Words like "gifted," "brilliant" and "genius" get thrown around to describe these students. Education researchers generally refer to them as "accelerated." It's a catch-all term to describe students who have either entered kindergarten early, grade-skipped or taken single subjects above grade level.

Part of the hype comes from how uncommon it is.

Researchers estimate no more than 2 percent of students fall into these categories.

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Code Switch
11:30 am
Wed April 29, 2015

How One West Baltimore Principal Helps Her Students Make Sense Of It All

Harden-Lindsey helps direct students after the school day ends.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 5:31 pm

Editor's note: Code Switch reporter Shereen Marisol Meraji spent Wednesday with a West Baltimore principal charged with a huge task: helping her middle and high school students, who are overwhelmingly poor and black, make sense of what's happening in Baltimore right now.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Several Florida School Districts Cut (Way) Back On Tests

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 9:04 am

Did you hear that?

It's the sound of hundreds of thousands of public school students in Florida breathing sighs of relief.

The state's largest school district, Miami-Dade County, just cut the number of district-created, end-of-course exams it will require from roughly 300 to 10. And even those 10 will be field-tested only, on just a sampling of students.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Delinquent. Dropout. At-Risk. When Words Become Labels

Sidney Poitier (right) and Glenn Ford (standing) in the 1955 film Blackboard Jungle.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 5:05 pm

Much of our recent reporting, especially from New Orleans, has focused on young people who are neither in school nor working. There are an estimated 5 1/2 million of them, ages 16 to 24, in the United States.

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NPR Ed
5:47 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

The Largest For-Profit College Shutdown In History

Corinthian operated colleges and training programs under the names Everest College, Heald, WyoTech and QuickStart Intelligence. This location is in Milwaukee.
Jeramey Jannene Flickr

The long-running story of the for-profit Corinthian Colleges has entered what looks like a final phase. As our colleagues at SCPR wrote:

"Corinthian Colleges will shut down all of its remaining 28 ground campuses, displacing about 16,000 students, less than two weeks after the U.S. Department of Education announced it was fining the for-profit institution $30 million for misrepresentation."

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NPR Ed
4:31 am
Mon April 27, 2015

In Texas, Questions About Prosecuting Truancy

Edgar Ramirez, 17, and his mother, Alma, appear before Judge Williams.
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 1:31 pm

As long as there have been schools and classes, there have been students who don't show up. And educators scratching their heads over what to do about it.

In most states, missing a lot of school means a trip to the principal's office. In Texas, parents and students are more likely to end up in front of a judge.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Sun April 26, 2015

What If Students Could Fire Their Professors?

LA Johnson/NPR

"Welcome to Iowa State University. May I take your paper, please?"

A bill circulating in the Iowa state Senate would rate professors' performance based on student evaluations. Just student evaluations.

Low-rated professors would be automatically fired — no tenure, no appeals.

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TED Radio Hour
9:49 am
Fri April 24, 2015

How Can Kids Help Parents Manage Their Family?

"[The family is] like a startup — where basically everybody has to contribute, you have to adapt all the time, you need some order, but you've got to keep moving forward." — Bruce Feiler
Courtesy Of TED

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 10:38 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Bruce Feiler's TED Talk

Parents help their kids manage their lives. But according to Bruce Feiler, it can work the other way around. It just takes a little insight drawn from Japanese computer programming principles.

About Bruce Feiler

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