Education

NPR Ed
5:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

How We Talk About Our Teachers

For his study Professor Benjamin Schmidt culled roughly 14 million reviews from the website Rate My Professor. Blue dots represent male professors, red dots female. The farther right the dot, the more often that the word on the left was used to describe the professor.
Alyson Hurt

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:57 pm

Male professors are far more likely to be considered "smart" or "brilliant" by their students, according to an analysis of reviews from the website Rate My Professor.

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Shots - Health News
4:27 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

When Pot Goes From Illegal To Recreational, Schools Face A Dilemma

Schools in Colorado are trying to find effective ways to teach the health effects of marijuana use. "When it's legal for your parents to smoke it or grow it," says one educator, "that changes the conversation."
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 11:21 am

Like many schools across Colorado, Arapahoe Ridge High School in Boulder has seen an increase in overall drug incidents since recreational marijuana became legal.

While public schools aren't required to report marijuana incidents separately from other drugs such as cocaine, evidence compiled by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News suggests more students are using marijuana.

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Education
8:29 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Imagining The Future: 'Howard Project' Students Look Forward

"Howard Project" participants (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Ariel Alford and Leighton Watson in the Howard University library.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:36 pm

In some ways, the questions young people grapple with are universal: Who are you? What's important to you? What kind of life do you want?

But at the same time, those questions are profoundly shaped by each person's experience.

As part of an ongoing conversation on Weekend Edition, four college seniors at a historically black university in Washington, D.C., are sharing insight into their experiences — both shared and individual.

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NPR Ed
5:58 am
Sun February 22, 2015

If Your Teacher Likes You, You Might Get A Better Grade

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 10:59 am

Were you ever the teacher's pet? Or did you just sit behind the teacher's pet and roll your eyes from time to time?

A newly published paper suggests that personality similarity affects teachers' estimation of student achievement. That is, how much you are like your teacher contributes to his or her feelings about you — and your abilities.

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Simon Says
8:19 am
Sat February 21, 2015

The Heavy Moral Weight Of Carnegie Mellon's 800 Botched Acceptances

Originally published on Sat February 21, 2015 9:20 am

A lot of people saw their hopes and dreams fulfilled this week — for just a few hours.

Carnegie Mellon University emailed about 800 people who had applied to graduate school to say, 'Congratulations, you're in.' They were — to quote the message of acceptance — "one of the select few" to be accepted into Carnegie Mellon's prestigious Master of Science in Computer Science program.

A young woman in India who was accepted wrote on Facebook that she quit her job, bolstered by this act of faith in her future. Her boyfriend proposed marriage.

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U.S.
3:31 am
Fri February 20, 2015

For Students In Ohio, A Crib Sheet For Interacting With Police

A crib sheet created to aid police-student interactions might be the first of its kind. The sheet was created by Akron, Ohio, high school students with help from the city's police department.
M.L. Schultze WKSU

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

This week, every middle and high school student in Akron, Ohio, is getting a glossy, two-sided card giving them suggestions for dealing with police.

It's a collaboration between an anti-violence youth group and the city's police department.

The "You and the Law" cards begin with the big picture: Stay out of trouble. And then a rapid succession of 15 points — control your emotions, answer questions about your identity, put your hands on the steering wheel in plain sight.

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Education
4:57 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Oklahoma May Scrap AP History For Focusing On America's 'Bad Parts'

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 9:47 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
4:13 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Now This Is An Example Of Truly Educational Radio

Jimmy Kamara, 9, is one of the students in Sierra Leone who use radios to continue their education while schools remain closed owing to Ebola.
Tolu Bade Courtesy of UNICEF

Originally published on Wed February 18, 2015 7:03 pm

Every day, 17-year-old Kaday goes to school by turning on the radio.

She's one of the million school-age children in Sierra Leone who've had no classroom to go to since July. That's when the government closed all schools to curb the spread of Ebola.

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NPR Ed
3:11 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

A Sophisticated Version Of Guess The Grape — But Is It A Sport?

An Oxford student practices for the upcoming wine-tasting match with the University of Cambridge.
Gabrielle Emanuel NPR

Originally published on Wed February 18, 2015 6:59 pm

As the 500-year-old bell tower tolls, about 25 students from the University of Oxford cross a medieval cobblestone street. They duck under a stone archway and slip into a room named after T.S. Eliot, who studied here a century ago.

The students drop their backpacks and get ready for practice. They're here to hone their tongues. This week, an elite team of Oxford's six best tasters will battle the University of Cambridge to see which group has the most refined palate.

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Code Switch
6:07 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Did South Carolina Sabotage Its Public Historically Black College?

Supporters of South Carolina State University rallied at the state's capitol on Monday to protest a proposal that would close the historically black college for two years.
Jeffrey Collins AP

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 6:18 pm

Last week, South Carolina lawmakers proposed shutting down the state's only public historically black college for two years.

"We are looking at a bankrupt institution," state House Rep. Jim Merrill told reporters. "No one takes any pleasure in recommending this."

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