12:26 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Think Tuition Is Rising Fast? Try Room And Board

Universities can have a hard time resisting the lure of luxury, which keeps room and board prices rising.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 5:46 pm

Valerie Inniss took out $11,500 in student loans this year to pay for the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

None of it was for tuition.

The 21-year-old is on a four-year, full-tuition scholarship, won on the strength of her high school test scores. And she qualifies for the maximum federal Pell Grant — $5,730 — for low-income students.

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The Salt
4:36 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Aspiring Craft Brewers Hit The Books To Pick Up Science Chops

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 12:20 pm

Here's how popular craft brewed beer is these days: On average, a new brewery opens its doors every single day in the the U.S.

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3:48 am
Wed April 8, 2015

States Review Laws Revoking Licenses For Student Loan Defaults

In 22 states, people who default on their student loans can have professional licenses suspended or revoked. The percentage of Americans who default on student loans has more than doubled since 2003.
Butch Dill AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 6:21 pm

Clementine Lindley says she had a great college experience, but if she had it to do over again, she probably wouldn't pick an expensive private school.

"I could actually buy a small home in Helena, Mont., with the amount of debt that I graduated with," she says.

Fresh out of school, Lindley says there were times when she had to decide whether to pay rent, buy food or make her student loan payments.

"There was a time where I defaulted on my student loans enough that I never was sent to collections, but just long enough to, honestly, ruin my credit."

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2:33 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Mexican-American Toddlers: Understanding The Achievement Gap

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 12:56 pm

Mexican-American toddlers born in the U.S. do not develop nearly as fast as white toddlers when it comes to language and pre-literacy skills. That's the main finding of a new study by the Institute of Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley.

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3:23 am
Tue April 7, 2015

A New Orleans High School Adapts To Unaccompanied Minors

G.W. Carver Preparatory Academy has enrolled more than 50 unaccompanied minors from Central America. Principal Ben Davis says he's spending an extra $2,500 per student for special education services and instructional software tailored for them.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 3:03 pm

For the past year now, many Americans have been hearing and reading about the 68,000 unaccompanied minors who have crossed illegally into the U.S. Nearly all of these minors come from El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras, and since their arrival, immigration officials have released most of them to their parents or relatives who already live in this country.

A number of these children and teenagers are in deportation proceedings, but while they wait, they have been allowed to attend public schools. In Louisiana, schools have enrolled nearly 2,000 of them.

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Michel Martin, Going There
3:21 am
Tue April 7, 2015

New Orleans Educator Dreams Of Teaching Tech To Beat The Streets

New Orleans educator Jonathan Johnson is founder and CEO of the Rooted School.
Jonathan Johnson

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 5:49 pm

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, much has been rebuilt in New Orleans — including the public schools. But the current education system is radically different from the one that people who grew up in New Orleans remember. Virtually all students in the city now attend charter schools. Many of their teachers are both new to New Orleans and new to teaching.

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6:07 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

Report Shreds 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story, But Many On Campus Have Moved On

An independent review of a Rolling Stone article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia found fundamental errors in the way the story was reported and edited. University President Teresa Sullivan said the story had damaged campus efforts to address sexual assault.
Zach Gibson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 1:49 pm

A report released Sunday about a Rolling Stone magazine story detailing an alleged rape at the University of Virginia is one more chapter in a long, troubling story for the campus.

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5:14 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

'Rolling Stone' Rape Story Report Details 'Systemic Failing' By Magazine

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 7:48 pm

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Goats and Soda
5:00 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

'Visibly Pregnant' Girls Are Banned From School In Sierra Leone

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 11:36 am

Across Sierra Leone, students are preparing to return to school April 14, after nine months off because of the Ebola epidemic. But one group has been banned from returning, according to a new decree by the minister of education: "visibly pregnant" girls.

Minister of Education Minkailu Bah announced the ban last week, explaining that "innocent girls" could be negatively affected by their pregnant peers. The ban would prevent seniors from taking the exams needed to graduate and attend college.

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12:19 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

In New Orleans, The Scramble For The Right Fit

In New Orleans, advertisements for charter schools — and for the annual Schools Expo — appear on billboards and bus stops.
Mallory Falk WWNO

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 3:01 pm

It's a Saturday morning, and school marching bands are playing for a crowd. But they're not in a Mardi Gras parade. They're in the Superdome, where 120 schools are set up at long tables, putting their best faces forward and trying to recruit families.

One gives on-the-spot instrument lessons, another is showing off it's step team.

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