Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

Sarah Fentem

A new study shows some people are still afraid to call 911 when helping an overdose victim, despite an Indiana law that permits friends and bystanders to administer the overdose antidote naloxone.

More than a quarter of people surveyed by two researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis said they didn’t call 911 at the scene of an overdose for fear of arrest.

IU Participates In Global Physics Experiment

Jul 21, 2017

Indiana University is collaborating on an experiment designed to answer some of the most fundamental questions in physics. 

The project breaks ground Friday in South Dakota. Crews will dig more than a mile underground to build caverns designed to store equipment that will detect neutrinos, a type of subatomic particle.

Stuart Mufson, an Indiana University astronomy professor, says neutrinos hold the key to understanding why matter — why anything — exists at all.

Older patients leaving hospitals and then nursing facilities have a better chance of staying at home if they receive an in-home visit soon after discharge according to a recent study from the IU Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute.

The report finds home health visits within a month reduce the risk of returning to a hospital by almost half.  Assistant professor Dr. Jennifer Carnahan says the goal is to keep people out of the health care system.

Indiana Unemployment Rate Continues Steady Decline

Jul 21, 2017

Indiana’s June unemployment rate dropped to 3.0 percent, bolstered by private sector growth. That growth helped fuel a 0.2 percent decline in Indiana’s unemployment rate, the lowest rate since November 2000.

The private sector added more than 10,100 jobs last month, primarily due to growth in business, educational and health services.

Layoffs began Thursday at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis, where last year President-elect Donald Trump celebrated a deal to save jobs from moving to Mexico.

Indiana’s top agriculture official has been tapped to oversee global farm trade for the Trump administration.

Indiana Department of Agriculture director Ted McKinney now faces a Senate confirmation to become the USDA’s first-ever trade undersecretary.

He says he’s grateful for the support he’s received since getting the news.

“I am so honored to be nominated by the president, and I look forward to serving if confirmed,” McKinney says.

The U.S. Department of Education (USED) sent a letter to state superintendent Jennifer McCormick this month outlining problems with the Indiana Department of Education’s security around student data.

The state receives grant money from USED for implementing security systems, which opened the state up to an audit.

State Investigating Controversial Herbicide Dicamba

Jul 20, 2017

Indiana farmers are filing complaints about a controversial herbicide, dicamba, that’s allegedly drifting from neighboring fields and damaging their crops.

Monsanto, DuPont, and BASF all released dicamba tolerant soybeans for this planting season. The herbicide is reportedly causing problems, says Dave Scott, the pesticide administrator for the Office of the Indiana State Chemist.

“You can suffer potential crop damage and potential yield loss,” says Scott, “because your beans are being impacted by what your neighbor applied to their beans.”

Becker aligned with Hill on opioid policy

Jul 19, 2017

Elkhart County Prosecutor Vicki Elaine Becker shares the zero tolerance policy for opioid dealers and users held by her predecessor, and now Indiana State Attorney General, Curtis Hill.

During a press conference on Wednesday, she stated, “We have always been aggressive, and we will continue to be aggressive, because it takes patience and it does take sacrifice in order to conduct these investigations. It takes time, sometimes weeks, sometimes months in order to make sure we’re coming after the right person. We can’t make mistakes in this.”

Elliot Englert / for Side Effects Public Media

The public has weighed in on Indiana’s proposal to add a work requirement to its unique Medicaid program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0.  More than 40 people submitted their opinions to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as of July 18, showing overwhelming disapproval of the proposal.

Milk Bank Expands Services, Breastfeeding Support

Jul 18, 2017

The Milk Bank in Indiana will extend services beyond the donation of mothers’ breast milk, which has been its mission for nearly 12 years. In doing so, the organization can provide more ways to help mothers and infants in need.

The bank is the only donor human milk bank in Indiana with more 40 depot sites across the state where women can give their milk to help infants staying in hospitals.  An average 27,000 ounces of milk are dispensed every month at The Milk Bank.

Indiana workforce officials are convening dozens of groups of local education and business leaders across the state to improve training efforts for new workers.

It’s the next phase of the Indiana’s SkillUp program, which aims to help localize training efforts for the state’s estimated million job openings in the next decade.

Senate GOP Leader David Long (R-Fort Wayne) didn’t wait long to anoint a new chair for the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Long named Sen. Ryan Mishler (R-Bremen) to replace retiring lawmaker Luke Kenley as the Senate’s budget architect. Mishler has served for five years as the No. 2 senator on the Appropriations Committee.

State To Appeal Ruling On Anti-Abortion Law

Jul 14, 2017

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill announced Friday the state will appeal a federal judge’s recent ruling halting parts of the state’s new anti-abortion law.

Federal Judge Sarah Evans Barker temporarily blocked three provisions of the controversial measure dealing with underage girls who seek abortions.

Indiana districts stand to lose more than $3.6 million per year over the next two decades, under proposed cuts to Medicaid spending under new federal healthcare legislation.

How school services would be effected has garnered little attention in the national debate as Republican lawmakers seek to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

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