Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited a high-performing private Indianapolis high school Tuesday, where nearly every student receives a voucher. She toured Providence Cristo Rey High School on a fact-finding mission and meet students and staff.

DeVos’ school visit follows a Monday speech in Indianapolis where she alluded to “an ambitious” federal expansion of school choice. DeVos did not lay out details of what a federal program could look like.

As Indiana farmers hurry through planting season – the corn crop is nearly three-quarters planted as of Monday, with soybeans nearly half done – they’re also watching big changes at the USDA.

The department is reorganizing its trade and rural development programs, while the White House takes aim at those issues in its own way.

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos praised Indiana’s expansive school choice laws in Indianapolis Monday and alluded to a federal effort to expand school choice at the conference.

DeVos gave the keynote address at the annual conference for the American Federation for Children, a school choice advocacy group.

Six months after President Donald Trump intervened in Carrier’s planned Indianapolis layoffs, the company is releasing the final number of jobs it still plans to cut.

The Department of Workforce Development got the appliance-maker’s official notification of the layoffs Monday, in a letter dated May 19.

It says 632 workers will lose their jobs at Carrier’s Indianapolis fan coil factory between late July and the end of the year.

More than 700 Indiana students received a certificate of multilingual proficiency from the state, meaning the students are proficient in two languages.

The Department of Education awarded this certificate, and this is the first cohort of students receiving the recognition.

Ex-Indiana Schools Chief Opens School Board Consulting Business

May 19, 2017

Glenda Ritz, Indiana’s former Superintendent of Public Instruction, will soon work on education matters in a new role. She now leads Advancing Public Schools as president and CEO.

The company’s mission is “dedicated to advancing the nation’s public school system through partnerships with local school boards in the areas of advocacy and literacy,” according to their website.

HIV/STD Conference Keeps Shapes Prevention Strategies

May 19, 2017

Health providers, public health leaders and other treatment professionals from around Indiana gathered in Indianapolis for the 2017 HIV/STD Update. The annual conference allows people working in and around the field of infectious disease to come together, hear from national and state leaders and shape strategy.

Medical director at the Bell Flower STD Clinic, Dr. Janet Arno, says the event can help keep the conversation updated.

Road construction season is underway, and after state lawmakers allocated more money for local roads, House Speaker Brian Bosma says communities should see a big season.

“We want them to start smelling asphalt in July,” Bosma said after unveiling the road funding package in April.

Indiana’s local communities will receive at least $200 million for roads and bridges in the state’s new infrastructure funding package.

Indiana Unemployment Rate Lowest Since Early 2001

May 19, 2017

The unemployment rate declined in April for the second consecutive month, down 0.3 of a percent to 3.6 percent. That’s the biggest single month drop since late 2010. And 3.6 percent is the lowest rate since February 2001.

But the Hoosier private sector lost 9,300 jobs last month. That’s the largest single month decline since June 2009. The losses were led by the manufacturing and private educational and health services sectors. And the private sector has now shed jobs four of the last five months.

A who’s-who of Midwest business leaders met in Indianapolis Thursday to talk about their stake in fixing updating the nation’s aging transportation system.

Many say Indiana’s plans for road repairs should stand as a national, multi-modal example.

Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper, who helped host the roundtable discussion, says the state and national economies rely on more than ships and barges. Changes at one part of the system, he says, have huge ripple effects on the rest.

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a bill Thursday providing aid for a lead contaminated neighborhood in East Chicago, Indiana.

House Bill 1344 expands lead testing in the soil and water of the USS Lead Superfund site in East Chicago. At the bill signing in East Chicago, Holcomb says nothing could be more important than getting the city back on track.

“From the street to your Statehouse to the White House, we are going to make sure East Chicago stays on track,” says Holcomb.

McCormick: ‘Concern’ 2 SBOE Seats Still Vacant

May 18, 2017

As two seats sit vacant on Indiana’s education policy-creating body, the state’s highest-ranking education official is concerned.

As Gary Community Schools prepares for a state-hired emergency manager to take control, the seat on the state education board that represents the district remains vacant.

The same goes for East Chicago Schools as it faces a lead contamination crisis in the community.

Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

Indiana’s corn and soybean growers are getting seeds in the ground this week – but more rain on the way could put farmers in a difficult position.

As of Monday, 56 percent of the state’s projected corn crop and 23 percent of the projected soybean crop have been planted.


Indiana Center for Evaluation and Education Policy

A new study shows Indiana’s schools are segregated by race and income, something that’s true across the state.

The study comes from Indiana University’s Center for Evaluation & Education Policy, and focuses on how students from different races and economic backgrounds intersect.

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