Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

The $130 billion merger between Dow and DuPont received conditional federal approval Thursday.

The companies still have to address areas where the Department of Justice says they’ll have too big a market share, but those aren’t the areas that have Indiana farmers worried.

In approving the merger, the DOJ says Dow and DuPont have to relinquish control of a few assets – a chemical plant in Texas for Dow, and two of DuPont’s insecticide and herbicide brands.

Mitchell Bridwell is a voracious reader.

The Pittsboro teen made his way through some Charles Dickens but would rather spend time inside the worlds of Rick Riordan or J. K. Rowling.

To make it through Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, he’ll have to run his fingertips through six volumes of the braille edition.

But for Mitchell, he’d much rather dig into modern fiction by smoothly running his fingertips over tiny dots of punctured paper than listening to any audio book or voiceover software.

Peter Balonon-Rosen/IPBS

This week, Side Effects Public Media released a report detailing how the president of an Indiana nonprofit is also lobbying for a drug company, Alkermes. The story, produced in collaboration with WFYI and NPR, has some political leaders in Indiana calling for stricter disclosure rules for lobbyists trying to influence policy. 

 

Indiana’s private sector had struggled this year, shedding jobs four out of five months heading into May. That included April’s losses, the largest single month decline in years.

But the private sector added 2,500 jobs last month, buoyed by growth in the private educational and health services and construction sectors.

Terrell Harris spent two years in prison on a drug charge when his son was a toddler.

Now, he worries about the effects of that absence.

“I’ve noticed a change in my son because of me not being there and being incarcerated,” Harris says.

For little kids, having a parent gone “constantly puts them in a stressful situation,” Harris says. “They are wishing their dad was here.”

Thursday marked the beginning of the end for 18 Marsh stores that weren’t bought out at a bankruptcy auction earlier this week.

Forty-four Marsh locations in Indiana and Ohio stayed open as the company started going through bankruptcy last month, but only 26 found a buyer at auction Monday.

The remaining 18 – in the Indianapolis area, Lafayette, Muncie, Kokomo, Carmel, Logansport, Connersville and Noblesville – have now started selling off their inventories.

Report: Indiana's Rural Schools Disproportionally Funded

Jun 15, 2017

Indiana has the eighth highest population of rural students in the country. One in four public school students in the state attend a rural school.

The Rural School and Community Trust issues a report each year to outline various issues rural schools across the country face. A major takeaway about Indiana is the amount the state funds rural school districts.

Fort Wayne Breaks Ground On Giant Sewer Tunnel

Jun 15, 2017

Fort Wayne public officials broke ground on the largest infrastructure project in the city’s history in an effort to improve water quality and reduce the amount of sewage that flows into rivers.

The city’s combined sewer system can cause sewage to overflow into rivers when it rains. A new five mile, $188 million tunnel will reduce those overflows by 90 percent.

Mayor Tom Henry says while public officials don’t often campaign on utility projects, providing “good, safe, clean water to our citizens” is one of the most important things the city can do.

The 18 Marsh grocery stores that don’t have a buyer will start selling off their inventories Thursday, according to a company spokesperson.

And a CVS spokesperson says his company has “settled” a dispute with the two Ohio grocery chains that want to buy Marsh’s 26 other remaining stores.

This clears the way for the combined $24 million deal with a Kroger subsidiary and another Ohio chain, Fresh Encounter, to go forward.

Ivy Tech Community college will undergo administrative changes this summer aimed at making each campus more community focused, addressing needs expressed by campuses across the state.

Ivy Tech’s campuses currently serve students at a regional level, but going forward they will focus on specific towns.

Every campus will have leadership focused on the specific needs of the town the campus is located in. Academics and local partnerships will focus on the specific workforce needs of that community.

UPS announced plans this week to open a $260 million shipping hub in Plainfield by 2019 – one of the first big logistics investments to come after the state passed its road funding plan.

The repairs and upgrades that $1 billion-a-year funding package will fund with tax and fee increases are a big deal for companies that rely on roads.

Two Ohio-based firms offered to buy more than half of the remaining Marsh grocery stores at Monday’s bankruptcy auction.

The deal hinges on the outcome of a dispute between Indiana-based Marsh and CVS Pharmacies.

At the auction in Delaware, Kroger subsidiary Topvalco offered $16 million for 11 Marsh stores in Indianapolis, Zionsville, Muncie, Bloomington, Brownsburg, Fishers and Greenwood.

That’s according to bankruptcy court documents filed Tuesday.

Planned Parenthood went to federal court to ask a judge to halt portions of Indiana’s new anti-abortion law before it takes effect.

And the judge seemed skeptical of some of the state’s arguments for upholding broad portions of the legislation passed this year.

The Indiana Republican Party demanded an apology Tuesday from Democrats who criticized a state investigation into possible voter fraud, after 12 people working for a political action committee were arrested in connection with that investigation.

Hoosier Children's Health Lags Behind In Kids Count

Jun 13, 2017

Children in Indiana are falling behind in a number of health measures according to the latest data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The 2017 Kids Count Data Book looks at children’s well-being in four areas: family, economics, education and health. In the health category, Indiana fell to 35th in the nation, down four spots.

There was a significant increase in the number of teen and children deaths and an eleven percent increase in the number of homicides and suicides. Indiana Youth Institute President Tammi Silverman says some of those deaths are preventable.

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