Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

Indiana Law Could Ruin Solar's Future At Schools

Aug 9, 2017

More groups – from utilities to businesses and even schools — are investing in solar energy. Its popularity continues to go up, while costs go down. But a law passed earlier this year by the Indiana General Assembly could spell trouble for the industry.

Take, for example, Tri-Creek School Corporation’s solar experiment.

A four-term congressman who’s vice chair of the U.S. House Budget Committee launched his U.S. Senate campaign Wednesday by attempting to target the so-called “Washington elite.”

Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) formally entered the Senate race, becoming the sixth Republican candidate trying to unseat incumbent U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.).

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue wrapped up a Midwest road trip at the Indiana State Fair Tuesday.

Perdue met in private with state lawmakers about their goals for the 2018 Farm Bill reauthorization.

That’s the $800 billion package of laws governing the nation’s agricultural and nutritional assistance programs.

A partnership between food banks and Ivy Tech is providing healthy produce to people around the state. The sweet corn project began two years ago when Ivy Tech’s Terre Haute campus launched a hands-on field experiment for students.

The Terre Haute agriculture program teaches modern farming technology. Its corn yield kept growing so the campus donated to local food banks.

Becky Miller with the Ivy Tech Foundation says, this summer, students planted three different fields.

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson says officials will work to help displaced families from a lead-contaminated public housing complex in East Chicago.

Carson met privately Monday with some residents and local lawmakers near the now-empty West Calumet Housing Complex. Gov. Eric Holcomb, Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch, U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky, U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly and Todd Young, and East Chicago Mayor Anthony Copeland joined the discussion.

New data from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education shows students are completing college sooner than in years past. But completion rates for minority students are still behind those of their white classmates.

Overall, 1 in 3 Indiana college students graduates on-time.

IBM owes Indiana more than $78 million after it failed to deliver on its contract to privatize the state’s welfare system a decade ago. A county judge determined the final dollar amounts in a decision published Monday.

It comes after the Indiana Supreme Court ruled last year IBM had breached its $1.3 billion contract with then-Gov. Mitch Daniels’ administration.

Barbara Anguiano / WVPE

The Hammond Teacher’s Federation and Hammond school district hosted the first of a series of events intended to help Latino Hoosiers understand immigration policy.

Community leaders from northwest Indiana helped lead the conference that drew more than 400 attendees.

Democratic State Senator Frank Mrvan says workshops at the event are the first step to understanding immigration’s big picture.

Diabetes educators from across the country are in Indianapolis for the annual American Association of Diabetes Educators to learn how to better reduce the widespread disease.

They come from all different backgrounds says local educator Jasmine Gonzalvo.

“We’re pharmacists, we’re physical therapists, we’re dieticians, we’re nurses,” Gonzalvo says. “Sometimes people don’t know about us, but as far as the wealth of resources we have to offer, we really should be at the forefront when you’re talking about helping a person with diabetes.”

Indiana Health Commissioner Jerome Adams will become the country’s new surgeon general. Adams had bipartisan support from all senators present during the vote to confirm this week.

During a hearing, Adams said the opioid epidemic will be a main focus and changing prescribing practices is an important piece of that.

The latest assessment from the American Cancer Society details where Indiana lags and what progress it’s made in cancer fighting policies. The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network annual progress report evaluates state legislative efforts.

American Cancer Society’s Bryan Hannon says failure to pass a cigarette tax increase last session set Indiana back in reducing smoking rates. But he says a modest funding increase for tobacco control programs was a step in the right direction.

 

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says the Senate will aim to prevent President Donald Trump from cutting off subsidies provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Through the Affordable Care Act, the government provides subsidies for co-pays and deductibles to help reduce the cost of insurance to consumers.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson will sit down with state lawmakers at East Chicago’s lead-contaminated public housing complex Monday.

The visit comes five months after three Indiana congressmen invited Carson to the USS Lead Superfund site, which is contaminated with high levels of lead and arsenic from old factories.

A proposal to ensure the transition of three schools under state control back to Indianapolis Public Schools did not gain approval from the State Board of Education Wednesday.

Instead, the board opted to leave open their options in 2020 when newly updated contracts expire between the state and Charter Schools USA, the for-profit Florida-based management company running the three schools.

Indiana’s three ports had their second-best start to the year ever in 2017.

Burns Harbor, Mt. Vernon and Jeffersonville moved 19 percent more cargo in the first six months of this year than at the same time in 2016 – 5.7 million tons overall.

Almost two-thirds of that went through the southwest port of Mt. Vernon, in the form of bulk cargoes – things like coal, ethanol, fertilizer and minerals, which get transferred between railcars, river barges and trucks.

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