Michigan News

Can the court enforce a school’s sanction for sexual assault? And did the University of Michigan deprive a student of his right to due process, when it found him responsible for that assault?

That’s what two separate lawsuits, both filed over the same sexual assault case, are asking this month.

A female student, who’s not being named by Michigan Radio, says she was raped at a frat party back in January.

At first, the school’s investigation ruled in favor of the accused male student. But that decision was overturned by the school’s appeals board.

A free market think-tank says the use of private contractors in public schools has grown over the last decade and a half.

Seventy percent of public school districts in Michigan forgo the search for janitors, bus drivers and cafeteria staff. Instead, those schools rely on private contractors for at least one of those services. In 2001 only about 30% of school districts outsourced services.

James Hohman is with the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, which conducted the study. He said no school can provide public education by itself.

Congressman Bill Huizenga is accustomed to lively town hall meetings. The meeting he held in Muskegon was no different. 

Hundreds of Huizenga's constituents attended the meeting. He was booed several times for supporting President Donald Trump and challenging the government's place in providing healthcare.

Huizenga says he supports Republican ideals more than any one person.

“What I support is a conservative philosophy that understands where people are coming from. It's not about one person,” Huizenga said. 

Imagine a blind date without someone in the other chair. This week, we are on the political dating circuit, meeting some of Michigan’s statewide hopefuls who will not appear on next year’s August primary ballot.

We’re talking about ticket-building and why some candidates for statewide office aren’t waiting until after next year’s primaries to go public with their aspirations.

Many states across the country cut funding for public higher education during the Great Recession. A new report shows the money hasn’t been replaced in most states – including in Michigan.

A new Center on Budget and Policy Priorities report looks at how states have slashed funding for public universities over the last decade. Michigan ranks in the middle. However, experts say that doesn’t paint the whole picture.

Wayne County’s prosecutor has until Monday to appeal a court ruling that allows a former state lawmaker to run for the Detroit City Council.

Former Senator Virgil Smith promised not to run for anything for five years as part of a plea deal.

Smith pleaded guilty to shooting his ex-wife’s car. A judge threw out part of the plea deal that said Smith can’t run for anything while he’s on probation.

There’s a new candidate for Michigan secretary of state.

Stan Grot announced he’s running today. He’s a Republican and current Shelby Township clerk. 

“He’s had integrity from the day one that I met him," said Jay Howse of Macomb County. "I’ve always had confidence in his decisions and I know he’ll be right.”            

One role of the Secretary of State is as the top elections officer.

The city of Kalamazoo will now have more money at its disposal -- half a billion dollars more.

The Kalamazoo City Commission last night approved a gift from a private foundation that will replace a portion of the city’s budget.

Mayor Bobby Hopewell says the Foundation for Excellence can be very important to the city's future.

"Perfection's not here, but I know we worked hard to cover the gamut of issues that may come up in the future," Hopewell said. 

Michigan's so-called "Safe Delivery" law has resulted in 202 newborns being safely surrendered since 2001.

The law lets a woman give up a newborn, anonymously if she wishes, at police and fire stations and hospitals.

Nearly all of the infant surrenders have taken place at hospitals, and most of those were at the same hospital where the woman gave birth. 

Program consultant Jean Hoffman says it's often the most desperate and frightened new mothers who have not heard about the law. So publicity efforts focus on trying to educate others who could help her.

Democrats in Lansing want to stop prescription drug price hikes in Michigan.

Prescription drug prices have gone up in Michigan and across the U.S. over the last few years. A recent study by Blue Cross Blue Shield Association showed that the prices its members pay have gone up about 10 percent a year since 2010.

In December, the state will start accepting applications for medical marijuana shops to get licenses. But meanwhile, there’s a dispute over how to deal with the dispensaries that are already open.

At a meeting today, the state’s medical marijuana licensing board considered whether dispensaries should have to close their doors before they can get a license. At least two board members want dispensaries that are already open to close next month – or risk being denied a license.

It started with a taping of a 90s daytime talk show. In March of 1995, The Jenny Jones Show did an episode about “secret same-sex crushes.” Scott Amedure, a Michigan resident, nervously gushed to the studio audience about his feelings for an acquaintance, Jonathan Schmitz. Schmitz was then brought out in front of the cameras, where Jones, the host, revealed that Amedure was his secret admirer.

“Did you have any idea that he liked you this much?” Jones asked.

A civil rights attorney announced her run for state Attorney General today.

Dana Nessel was an attorney for a same sex couple whose case went on to be part of the U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage.

More recently, the Democrat is part of a task force with the Wayne County prosecutor’s office to investigate hate crimes against the LGBT community.

Nessel is a former prosecuting attorney. She says she isn’t worried about only being viewed as the LGBT candidate.

A grassroots group that wants to get an anti-gerrymandering proposal on the 2018 ballot is looking to make progress this week.

Voters Not Politicians is the non-partisan group in charge of the effort. It wants to change how the state draws its district lines.

The Board of State Canvassers will meet Thursday to approve or reject the form of the petition. It will look at things like font size and which portions of the constitution are referenced. This is meant to prevent lawsuits for improper format down the road.

As violence erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia this weekend, some of Michigan's lawmakers took to social media.  

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