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Around the Nation
4:50 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Lake Mead Levels Drop, The West Braces For Bigger Drought Impact

Lake Mead is at its lowest levels since it was built in the late 1930s.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

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Asia
5:12 am
Fri April 17, 2015

India, China Seek To Capitalize On Nepal's Water Wealth

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 7:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
8:44 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Feds Cancel Commercial Sardine Fishing After Stocks Crash

A tray of sardines in Costa Mesa, California, in this November 17, 2014 photo. Plummeting sardine populations force a complete ban on sardine fishing off the U.S. West Coast for more than a year.
LUCY NICHOLSON Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 7:58 am

Life has suddenly gotten easier for the sardine. Federal regulators are not only closing the commercial sardine fishing season early in Oregon, Washington and California, but it will stay closed for more than a year.

The decision to shut down the sardine harvest is an effort to build up depleted stocks of the small, oily fish. The conservation group, Oceana, says that sardine populations have crashed more than 90 percent since 2007.

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Environment
5:16 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

California Cities Struggle To Enforce Mandatory Water Restrictions

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

Gov. Jerry Brown ordered the state to cut back its water use by 25 percent overall and mandated specific targets for each city. But some are still figuring out how to enforce cutbacks, including in San Diego, where the target is 20 percent.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Around the Nation
5:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

In Record Drought, California Golf Course Ethically Keeps Greens Green

A bio-filtration basin, pictured during installation in 2007, captures water runoff from the Pelican Hill golf club's maintenance facility. The water is filtered through grass, gravel, sand, soil and filter fabric into an underground drainage system.
Pelican Hill

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 1:58 pm

In drought-stricken California, golf is often seen as a bad guy — it can be hard to defend watering acres of grass for fun when residents are being ordered to cut their usage and farmers are draining their wells.

But golf is a $6 billion industry in the state and employs nearly 130,000 workers, according to the California Golf Course Owners Association. So while the greens are staying green, some golf courses are saving every drop of water they can.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Desalination Plants: Drought Cure Or Growth Enabler?

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:47 am

Copyright 2015 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit http://www.kqed.org.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Salt
3:51 am
Thu April 16, 2015

How Almonds Became A Scapegoat For California's Drought

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:05 am

You may have heard by now that it takes one gallon of water to produce just one almond. And those are considered fighting words in drought-stricken California, which produces 80 percent of the world's supply of the tasty and nutritious nut.

So when almond grower Daniel Bays hears that, he just shakes his head.

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The Salt
3:35 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Redistribute California's Water? Not Without A Fight

Workers pick asparagus in early April at Del Bosque Farms in Firebaugh, Calif. This year, some farmers in the state will get water, others won't, based on when their land was first irrigated.
David Paul Morris Bloomberg/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 11:09 am

The state of California is asking a basic question right now that people often fight over: What's a fair way to divide up something that's scarce and valuable? That "something," in this case, is water.

There's a lot at stake, including your very own nuts, fruits and vegetables, because most of the water that's up for grabs in California goes to farmers. This year, some farmers will get water, and others will not, simply based on when their land was first irrigated.

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NPR Ed
12:00 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

If Walls Could Talk: What Lead Is Doing To Our Students

Peeling lead paint in a New York City apartment. Many buildings built before 1960 still have high amounts of lead.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:04 pm

Every child's ability to succeed in school is influenced by lots of external factors: teacher quality, parenting, poverty, geography, to name a few. But far less attention has been paid to the power of a child's bedroom walls. Or, rather, the paint that's on them and the lead that may be in that paint.

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Mountain Lion That Hid Out Under LA Home Appears To Have Left

The mountain lion known as P-22 is seen in Los Angeles' Griffith Park in November 2014. He hid out for a time in the crawl space of a Los Angeles home.
National Park Service AP

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 2:30 pm

Updated at 1:02 p.m. ET

The mountain lion who spent Monday night under a Los Angeles home despite authorities' best efforts to dislodge him appears to have left on his own, a wildlife official says.

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