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The Salt
7:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Watch Your Back, Kale. Kelp Is Gunning For The Veggie Du Jour Title

Alaria, a type of seaweed also known as "Wild Atlantic Wakame," grows in the North Atlantic Ocean and is similar to Japanese wakame, a common ingredient in miso soup.
Courtesy of Sarah Redmond

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 2:47 pm

The story of how kale went from frumpy to trendy is a great inspiration to Gabriela Bradt, a fisheries specialist at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

"Nobody cared about kale. Then it became the green du jour," says Bradt.

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Environment
5:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

How President Obama Wants To Shrink The Government's Carbon Footprint

President Obama views solar panels on the roof of the Department of Energy with Deputy Secretary Liz Sherwood-Randall, second from right, Federal Chief Sustainability Officer Kate Brandt, right, and Energy Manager Eric Haukdal, left.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 2:02 pm

President Obama wants to shrink the federal government's carbon footprint.

With hundreds of thousands of buildings and vehicles, the government is the nation's single biggest energy consumer. The president signed an executive order Thursday directing agencies to get more of their power from clean energy sources.

"We're going to cut the federal government's greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent from 2008 levels within the next ten years," Obama said, after touring a rooftop array of solar panels at the Department of Energy.

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The Two-Way
2:28 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Obama Orders Reduction In Government's Greenhouse Gas Emissions

President Obama on Thursday signs an executive order directing the federal government to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next decade.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 4:44 pm

President Obama signed an executive order at the White House on Thursday directing the federal government to cut its emissions of greenhouse gases by 40 percent from 2008 levels within the next decade and to increase its use of renewable energy sources to 30 percent of total consumption.

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Science
3:35 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Scientists Catch Up On The Sex Life Of Coral To Help Reefs Survive

Staghorn coral planted by scientists in the Florida Keys. Researchers hope to give the same sort of boost to the world's shrinking population of pillar coral, now that they can raise the creatures in a laboratory.
Joe Berg/Way Down Video/Mote

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:54 am

For the first time, biologists have caught a rare type of coral in the act of reproducing, and they were able to collect its sperm and eggs and breed the coral in the laboratory.

The success is part of an effort to stem the decline in many types of coral around the world.

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Environment
3:22 am
Wed March 18, 2015

After Toxic Ash Spill, Energy Company And Locals Struggle Over Solution

The abandoned Cherokee Clay and Brick Mine in Lee County, N.C., may become a landfill for coal ash.
Dave DeWitt WUNC

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 12:23 pm

When utility companies burn coal to make electricity — and it generated 39 percent of U.S. energy in 2013 — it leaves behind ash that can contain arsenic, selenium, boron and many other toxic substances.

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Code Switch
8:18 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Old Land Battle Resurfaces In Georgia Between The Gullah And The Government

Hundreds of adult wood storks gather on the tops of trees at the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.
Stephen B. Morton AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:19 pm

More than 70 years ago, the federal government took land from descendants of West African slaves, known as the Gullah, living in Georgia. Now they're fighting to get it back.

In 1942, they were given just weeks to leave marsh property on the Georgia coast so that the U.S. military could construct an air base for training pilots and conducting anti-submarine flights. Twenty years later, the former base and the land around it were converted into the 2,762-acre Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.

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Environment
7:48 am
Sat March 14, 2015

Guardian Editor Pledges To Bolster Coverage Of Climate Change

Originally published on Sat March 14, 2015 5:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Music Reviews
7:48 am
Sat March 14, 2015

Ooze, Fog And Climate Change Threaten Mummies

Originally published on Sat March 14, 2015 5:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Northern Chile is home to some 7,000-year-old mummies, some of the oldest mummies in the world. But scientists say the mummies are in danger. NPR's Jasmine Garsd has this story about mummies, strange oozing substances and a mysterious fog.

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The Salt
7:48 am
Sat March 14, 2015

The Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution

Mas Masumoto grew up on his family farm southeast of Fresno, Calif. His 1987 essay "Epitaph for A Peach," in which he bemoaned the loss of heirloom flavors, captured his changing philosophy as a farmer. It also helped turn his farm into a landmark in the local-food movement.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:50 pm

In the heart of California's Central Valley, a vast expanse of orchards, vineyards, and vegetable fields, lies a small collection of aging peach trees. Farmer Mas Masumoto's decision to preserve those trees, and then to write about it, became a symbol of resistance to machine-driven food production.

Yet the Masumoto farm's story isn't just one of saving peaches. It's become a father-daughter saga of claiming, abandoning, and then re-claiming a piece of America's agricultural heritage.

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U.S.
4:28 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Plans To Explore For Oil Offshore Worry East Coast Residents

Mayor Billy Keyserling of Beaufort, S.C., speaks out against drilling for oil offshore, Jan. 14. He says local votes expressing opposition to oil drilling plans are important even if they don't hold the force of law.
Bruce Smith AP

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 7:37 am

As the Obama administration opens the door to offshore drilling, the oil industry is promising more jobs and less reliance on foreign oil. Some people who live along the Eastern Seaboard are saying, "no thanks."

Coastal towns and cities in several states are formally opposing offshore drilling and oil exploration.

Tybee Island, Ga., is a short drive across the marsh from the historic city of Savannah. The island is dotted with hotels and tiny vacation cottages for tourists — and for about 3,000 people, it's home.

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