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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Arizona Tribes Wade Into The Water Business

Jan 18, 2016
Copyright 2016 KJZZ-FM. To see more, visit KJZZ-FM.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Separation of church and state? When it comes to fighting food waste, the U.S. government is looking to partner up with the faithful.

Copyright 2016 Wyoming Public Radio Network. To see more, visit Wyoming Public Radio Network.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Florida's Everglades is known for its alligators, and in recent years, pythons. Burmese pythons aren't native to the Everglades. But over the last two decades, the snakes, which can grow up to 20 feet, have become established there and taken a big toll on native wildlife.

With the pythons, there's another new Florida species — the python hunter. They've been featured on National Geographic and the Discovery Channel. And hunters are descending on the Everglades this month for a competition — the Python Challenge.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

More Bad News For Coal Mine-Reliant States

Jan 16, 2016
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In President Obama's State of the Union address, there was a line you might have missed, but it caught the ear of people in the energy industry.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

The company that owns the leaking natural gas well in Los Angeles understated the number of air samples showing higher-than-usual levels of benzene, The Associated Press reports.

Adding to concerns over the disaster, efforts to stop the leak appear to have destabilized the well, the Los Angeles Times reports, raising the risk of a blowout.

Citing concerns over pricing and pollution, the Obama administration on Friday unveiled a moratorium on new coal leases on federal lands. The change won't affect existing leases, which generated nearly $1.3 billion for the government last year.

The Department of the Interior says it wants to make sure the money it's charging for coal leases takes into account both market prices and what's often called the "social costs" of coal — its impact on climate change and public health.

The agency says federal lands account for roughly 40 percent of all U.S. coal production.

Millions of bats are dying due to a deadly disease sweeping across the United States, their tiny bodies strewn across cave floors.

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