Local News

Barb Anguiano / WVPE

 

The city of South Bend announced it will join dozens of other cities across the country and file a federal lawsuit against opioid manufacturers and distributors alleging misinformation about the effects of opioids.

Mayor Pete Buttigieg said during a press conference that the lawsuit sends a simple message; someone needs to be held accountable for the damage opioids have caused to the city and residents of South Bend. He said the city is looking for financial restitution due to increased costs necessary to help deal with the opioid crisis.  

Barb Anguiano / WVPE

 

 

Instead of 17 minutes, students at Washington High School stood outside in 29 degree weather for 20 minutes. Senior Lauraine Davidson, who helped organize the walkout, led students with chants of, “No more silence, stop the violence.”
 

  She said each of the extra three minutes students stood outside honored one of three 17-year-olds killed by guns in the area, since the beginning of 2018. Among those teens was a Washington High Student, Tysiona Crawford.

 

about 300 students gather in a circle listening to one talk
Jennifer Weingart

 

Students across the country staged walkouts Wednesday including most of the students at Bethany Christian Schools in Goshen.

The walkout is in remembrance of the 17 victims of the Parkland school shooting in Florida a month ago, and to protest for gun law reform and safer schools.

About 80 percent of Bethany’s 350 students gathered in the lobby by the gym at 10 o’clock for song, prayer and strong words from organizer Elizabeth Eby, a senior at the school.

Derek Jensen / Wikimedia Commons

 

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg touted past successes and laid out plans for new initiatives at last night’s state of the city address.

Buttigieg covered a lot of ground in his state of the city address. He talked about success with the new department of Venues, Parks and Arts, bringing American Airlines back and the city’s double-A bond rating...among others.

Morning Edition host Michael Linville speaks with Alan Hamlet, an assistant professor of civic and environmental engineering and earth sciences at The University of Notre Dame, about the affects climate change could have on Indiana.

West Side South Bend

 

South Bend’s West Side has been seeing more new faces lately, due in part to local community advocacy and the city’s efforts to redevelop the area’s streetscape. One local group, West Side South Bend has led efforts to bring attention to the area, one of the most popular events the group hosts is West Side Wednesday.

 

Every first Wednesday of the month, West Side South Bend hosts a lunchtime  get-together at an area restaurant. This month, Sabor a Mexico.
 

Notre Dames golden dome
Jennifer Weingart / WVPE

 

 A study out of the University of Notre Dame has found that conception rates may be an early indicator of an economic recession. Researchers found declines in conceptions lead the last three recessions by about a year.

 

A conference taking place in South Bend in April is hoping to give participants a unique way to bring about social change.

Interaction Initiative Inc. is putting on the conference. It’s meant for people who want to find ways to use theatre and art to highlight issues dealing with social justice.

Taeyin ChoGlueck is one of the co-founders of Interaction Initiative. She said they want people to leave to conference with real ideas for change.

Barbara Anguiano / WVPE

 

 

As Elkhart residents begin the process of recovery after days of flooding, Mayor Tim Neese addressed related concerns today in the city. Police Chief Ed Windbigler and Fire Chief Chad Carey joined the mayor as he addressed the press.
 

Neese commended the support the city has received from local communities, and the work that city departments have done since the flooding. .
 

He said the main focus now is on recovery and cleanup.
 

A yellow car sits on dry ground with water covering the street behind it
Jennifer Weingart

 

It was sunny and warm in South Bend on Monday. And the river has receded quite a bit, but some roads and parks are still closed.

 

The St. Joseph River at South Bend is down to just over nine and a half feet. That’s still within major flood stage, but down three feet from where it peaked last week.

Sheryl Brown was out for a lunchtime walk around Bartlett Street in South Bend with three of her colleagues from Memorial Hospital.

The river swells to cover houses and a pavillion in water
Jennifer Weingart

 

As flood waters continue receding some people are able to get back into their homes to clean-up, but other houses are still underwater.

On top of that, power is still shut off for safety and some areas have to deal with looting.

Generators hum all through formerly flooded neighborhoods in Elkhart as residents pump out water and work on drying their basements.

There’s no electricity here. The power was shut off to prevent electrical fires.

Water nearly reaches the arches under Jefferson Boulevard
Jennifer Weingart

 

The St. Joseph and Elkhart Rivers have both peaked and are starting to recede. Still some residents living in the flood zone continue to battle water while others start to think about clean-up.

The St. Joseph River peaked last night at 12.7 feet, nearly two feet above the historic flood mark of 10.9 last set in 1993.

Lime Bike in water in howard park
Jennifer Weingart

 

  Some schools and roads around the area are closed as rivers continue to rise. About five or six inches of rain in the last 48 hours has put area waterways above flood stage and flooded roads, homes and businesses. Rain is not predicted for Wednesday but could fall again along with snow on Thursday and Friday.

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